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dodo

do·do

 (dō′dō)
n. pl. do·does or do·dos
1. A large flightless bird (Raphus cucullatus) with a hooked beak that inhabited the island of Mauritius in the Indian Ocean until it became extinct in the late 1600s.
2. Informal One who is out-of-date, as in dress or ideas.
3. Informal A stupid person; an idiot.

[Portuguese dodó, alteration of obsolete Dutch dodors : Dutch dot, tuft of feathers + obsolete Dutch ors, tail (from Middle Dutch ærs; see ors- in Indo-European roots).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dodo

(ˈdəʊdəʊ)
n, pl dodos or dodoes
1. (Animals) any flightless bird, esp Raphus cucullatus, of the recently extinct family Raphidae of Mauritius and adjacent islands: order Columbiformes (pigeons, etc). They had a hooked bill, short stout legs, and greyish plumage. See also ratite
2. informal an intensely conservative or reactionary person who is unaware of changing fashions, ideas, etc
3. (as) dead as a dodo (of a person or thing) irretrievably defunct or out of date
[C17: from Portuguese doudo, from doudo stupid]
ˈdodoism n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

do•do

(ˈdoʊ doʊ)

n., pl. -dos, -does.
1. a large, extinct, flightless bird, Raphus cucullatus, of the pigeon family, formerly inhabiting Mauritius.
2. Slang. a dull-witted, slow-reacting person.
[1620–30; < Portuguese doudo, fool, madman]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

dodo

- Comes from Portuguese doudo, "fool, simpleton," from the bird's awkward appearance.
See also related terms for simpleton.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dodo - someone whose style is out of fashion
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
2.dodo - extinct heavy flightless bird of Mauritius related to pigeons
columbiform bird - a cosmopolitan order of land birds having small heads and short legs with four unwebbed toes
genus Raphus, Raphus - type genus of the Raphidae: dodos
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
додо
dronte
DodoDronte
dodo
dododronte
dododrontti
dodo
dúdúfugl
dodo
dodo
dodo

dodo

[ˈdəʊdəʊ] N (dodos or dodoes (pl))
1. (Zool) → dodó m
see also dead A1
2. (US) (= fool) → bobo/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

dodo

[ˈdəʊdəʊ] [dodoes] (pl) n
dronte m
(= silly person) → andouille f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

dodo

n
Dodo m, → Dronte f; as dead as a dodomausetot
(US inf: = silly person) → Trottel m (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

dodo

[ˈdəʊdəʊ] n
a. (Zool) → dodo
as dead as a dodo → morto/a e sepolto/a
b. (fam) (fool) → scemo/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
"Yes, Mas'r," said Dodo, submissively; "he got that dust on his own self."
"How could you be so cruel and wicked to poor Dodo?" asked Eva.
"Dear Cousin, you don't know Dodo; it's the only way to manage him, he's so full of lies and excuses.
"Why, Eva, you've really taken such a fancy to Dodo, that I shall be jealous."
A few cuts never come amiss with Dodo,--he's a regular spirit, I can tell you; but I won't beat him again before you, if it troubles you."
"Well, Dodo, you've done pretty well, this time," said his young master, with a more gracious air.
But Eva bent to the other side of the horse, where Dodo was standing, and said, as he relinquished the reins,--"That's a good boy, Dodo;--thank you!"
It was high time to go, for the pool was getting quite crowded with the birds and animals that had fallen into it: there were a Duck and a Dodo, a Lory and an Eaglet, and several other curious creatures.
And before we judge of them too harshly we must remem- ber what ruthless and utter destruction our own species has wrought, not only upon animals, such as the vanished bison and the dodo, but upon its inferior races.
Burdened with the guilty consciousness of the sequestered tarts, and fearing that Dodo's sharp eyes would pierce the thin disguise of cambric and merino which hid their booty, the little sinners attached themselves to `Dranpa', who hadn't his spectacles on.
'I am the Dodo,' he says, 'and I can do you to a frazzle.
Tom Platt dealt with his interminable trip round the Horn on the old Ohio in the flogging days, with a navy more extinct than the dodo - the navy that passed away in the great war.