dogaressa


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dogaressa

(ˌdəʊɡəˈrɛsə)
n
(Historical Terms) history obsolete the wife of a doge
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
AIN 1.55 Definitely Glad (IRE) ..............STR 2.10 Diamondsinthesky (IRE) ......WOL 6.15 Disclosure .............................DON 4.25 Doc Hay (USA).......................DON 3.15 Doctor Harper (IRE)................STR 5.05 Dogaressa (IRE).....................NBU 1.15 Doing Fine (IRE) ....................
Frank's "A Face in the Crowd: Identifying the Dogaressa at the Ospedale dei Crociferi" addresses issues of "historical multivalence" in Venetian art, here understood as the potential for topical allusion in pictorial representations of historical events.
Holly Hurlburt's book aims to examine "the development of the office of the dogaressa, its public functions, and restrictions in the period from 1200 to 1500" (8).
Wilson draws both on the Battle of Lepanto in 1571 and the ritual ceremonies involved in the 1597 coronation of the Dogaressa Morosina Morosini Grimani.
The author almost re-creates the actual event of the coronation of the dogaressa in 1597.
(26) Hoffmann's tale 'Doge and Dogaressa', on the other hand, tells the same story, but has elements of Gothic horror and fairy-tale mingled into its historical frame.
Malpezzi Price's articulation of social structures in sixteenth-century Venice includes the analysis of women's place in political life through the description of the role assigned to the Doge's wife, the Dogaressa, and the investigation of emerging organizations aimed at protecting or welcoming women unable to enter the increasingly deteriorating marriage market.
His Dogaressa was portrayed by the young Spanish soprano Angeles Blancas with a strong, penetrating sound, marked by a singular emotive quality, appropriate for the part.
In a very different context, Holly Hurlburt examines the entrance procession of the Venetian dogaressa. This was one of the few occasions during which enclosed Venetian women appeared in public, without their husbands or other chaperones.
Hurlburt, "Individual Fame and Family Honor: The Tomb of Dogaressa Agnese da Mosto Venier"; Laura D.
"'il bel sesso, e l' austero Senato': The Coronation of Dogaressa Morosina Morosini Grimani." Renaissance Quarterly 52: 73-139.
That the coronation in 1597 of Dogaressa Morosina Morosini Grimani signaled the intact Virgin's final victory over sexually active Venus, as Sperling claims at the end of this chapter, remains unpersuasive, for she has constructed a "battle" that never actually took place.