doge

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doge

 (dōj)
n.
The elected chief magistrate of the former republics of Venice and Genoa.

[Italian dialectal, from Latin dux, duc-, leader, from dūcere, to lead; see deuk- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

doge

(dəʊdʒ)
n
(Historical Terms) (formerly) the chief magistrate in the republics of Venice (until 1797) and Genoa (until 1805)
[C16: via French from Italian (Venetian dialect), from Latin dux leader]
ˈdogeship n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

doge

(doʊdʒ)

n.
the chief magistrate in the former republics of Venice and Genoa.
[1540–50; < Upper Italian (Venetian) < Latin ducem, acc. of dux leader; compare duce, duke]
doge′dom, n.
doge′ship, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.doge - formerly the chief magistrate in the republics of Venice and Genoadoge - formerly the chief magistrate in the republics of Venice and Genoa
judge, jurist, justice - a public official authorized to decide questions brought before a court of justice
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

doge

[dəʊdʒ] Ndux m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
[47] This event supposedly took place during the dogeship of Pietro Tribuno (888-912), whose construction of a replica of the Holy Sepulchre at San Zaccaria is clearly associated with the annual dogal visit on Easter, which had previously been celebrated on the September feast of the Exaltation of the Cross.
In the pathos of tone with which he describes the youth and innocence of the Queen, Disraeli thematizes his concern for the weakening of the monarchy into a "Venetian dogeship." However, Disraeli's hope for at least a symbolic strengthening of the Monarchy in Victoria's reign is equally conveyed by the tone of the passage; consonant with the organicist vision of change that underlies the historical plot, Victoria's ascension to the throne symbolizes the possibility of national revival after a period of corruption and decay under the later Hanoverians.
[40] His management of the Paduan operation marked the beginning of his identification with the Cambrai war and for the first time made him a contender for the dogeship. When he took Padua, "Everyone said: 'This is the occasion for which he gains the ducal cap.'" [41] In 1531, Titian produced a votive painting for Doge Gritti in which Santa Marina presents him to the Madonna, supposedly saying, "He was elected for having recaptured Padua on my day, 17 July." [42] In the mid-1530s, Bordone painted the Donation of St.