dogma


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Related to dogma: incontrovertibly

dog·ma

 (dôg′mə, dŏg′-)
n. pl. dog·mas or dog·ma·ta (-mə-tə)
1. A doctrine or a corpus of doctrines relating to matters such as morality and faith, set forth in an authoritative manner by a religion.
2. A principle or statement of ideas, or a group of such principles or statements, especially when considered to be authoritative or accepted uncritically: "Much education consists in the instilling of unfounded dogmas in place of a spirit of inquiry" (Bertrand Russell).

[Latin, from Greek, opinion, belief, from dokein, to seem, think; see dek- in Indo-European roots.]

dogma

(ˈdɒɡmə)
n, pl -mas or -mata (-mətə)
1. (Theology) a religious doctrine or system of doctrines proclaimed by ecclesiastical authority as true
2. (Philosophy) a belief, principle, or doctrine or a code of beliefs, principles, or doctrines: Marxist dogma.
[C17: via Latin from Greek: opinion, belief, from dokein to seem good]

dog•ma

(ˈdɔg mə, ˈdɒg-)

n., pl. -mas, -ma•ta (-mə tə)
1. a system of principles or tenets, as of a church.
2. a specific tenet or doctrine authoritatively put forth, as by a church.
3. prescribed doctrine: political dogma.
4. an established belief or principle.
[1590–1600; < Latin < Greek, =dok(eîn) to seem, think, seem good + -ma n. suffix]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dogma - a religious doctrine that is proclaimed as true without proof
article of faith, credendum - (Christianity) any of the sections into which a creed or other statement of doctrine is divided
church doctrine, religious doctrine, creed, gospel - the written body of teachings of a religious group that are generally accepted by that group
2.dogma - a doctrine or code of beliefs accepted as authoritative; "he believed all the Marxist dogma"
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school

dogma

noun
1. blind faith, certainty, unquestioning belief, arrogant conviction freeing the country from the grip of dogma
2. doctrine, teachings, principle, opinion, article, belief, creed, tenet, precept, credo, article of faith, code of belief the dogma of the Immaculate Conception

dogma

noun
A principle taught or advanced for belief, as by a religious or philosophical group:
Translations
عَقيدَه
dogma
dogmetrossætning
dogmidoktriini
dogma
kredda; trúarkenning; kenningakerfi
dogma
dogma
dogmat
dogma
dinî inanışdogma

dogma

[ˈdɒgmə] N (dogmas or dogmata (pl)) [ˈdɒgmətə]dogma m

dogma

[ˈdɒgmə] ndogme m

dogma

nDogma nt

dogma

[ˈdɒgmə] ndogma m

dogma

(ˈdogmə) noun
opinions settled or fixed by an authority, eg the Church.
References in classic literature ?
Dogma gives a charter to mistake, but the very breath of science is a contest with mistake, and must keep the conscience alive.
Each race writes its line upon the book, as it passes; it erases the ancient Romanesque hieroglyphs on the frontispieces of cathedrals, and at the most one only sees dogma cropping out here and there, beneath the new symbol which it has deposited.
I will simply call your attention to the fact that your modern systems of popular election, of two chambers, and of juries all had their origin in provincial and oecumenical councils, and in the episcopate and college of cardinals; but there is this difference,--the views of civilization held by our present-day philosophy seem to me to fade away before the sublime and divine conception of Catholic communion, the type of a universal social communion brought about by the word and the fact that are combined in religious dogma.
That there is much to be said for Nietzsche's hypothesis of the Eternal Recurrence of all things great and small, nobody who has read the literature on the subject will doubt for an instant; but it remains a very daring conjecture notwithstanding and even in its ultimate effect, as a dogma, on the minds of men, I venture to doubt whether Nietzsche ever properly estimated its worth (see Note on Chapter LVII.
Now, as always, Clare's father was sanguine as a child; and though the younger could not accept his parent's narrow dogma he revered his practice, and recognized the hero under the pietist.
As for the dogma, she could not understand it and did not even try.
Peter's to hear the publishing of the dogma of the Immaculate Conception.
To the last Lavalle was a Catholic of the old school, accepting--he who had looked into the very heart of the lightnings--the dogmas of papal infallibility, of absolution, of confession--of relics great and small.
She had a strange religion of transmigration of souls all her own, in which she had firm faith, troubling herself little about the dogmas of the Church.
Though he had thrown on one side the Christian dogmas it never occurred to him to criticise the Christian ethics; he accepted the Christian virtues, and indeed thought it fine to practise them for their own sake, without a thought of reward or punishment.
I shall devote myself for a time to the examination of the Roman Catholic dogmas, and to a careful study of the workings of their system: if I find it to be, as I half suspect it is, the one best calculated to ensure the doing of all things decently and in order, I shall embrace the tenets of Rome and probably take the veil.
Grant so happily blended the universally received opinions of the Christian faith with the dogmas of his own church that, although none were entirely exempt from the influence of his reasons, very few took any alarm at the innovation.