dogma

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dog·ma

 (dôg′mə, dŏg′-)
n. pl. dog·mas or dog·ma·ta (-mə-tə)
1. A doctrine or a corpus of doctrines relating to matters such as morality and faith, set forth in an authoritative manner by a religion.
2. A principle or statement of ideas, or a group of such principles or statements, especially when considered to be authoritative or accepted uncritically: "Much education consists in the instilling of unfounded dogmas in place of a spirit of inquiry" (Bertrand Russell).

[Latin, from Greek, opinion, belief, from dokein, to seem, think; see dek- in Indo-European roots.]

dogma

(ˈdɒɡmə)
n, pl -mas or -mata (-mətə)
1. (Theology) a religious doctrine or system of doctrines proclaimed by ecclesiastical authority as true
2. (Philosophy) a belief, principle, or doctrine or a code of beliefs, principles, or doctrines: Marxist dogma.
[C17: via Latin from Greek: opinion, belief, from dokein to seem good]

dog•ma

(ˈdɔg mə, ˈdɒg-)

n., pl. -mas, -ma•ta (-mə tə)
1. a system of principles or tenets, as of a church.
2. a specific tenet or doctrine authoritatively put forth, as by a church.
3. prescribed doctrine: political dogma.
4. an established belief or principle.
[1590–1600; < Latin < Greek, =dok(eîn) to seem, think, seem good + -ma n. suffix]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dogma - a religious doctrine that is proclaimed as true without proof
article of faith, credendum - (Christianity) any of the sections into which a creed or other statement of doctrine is divided
church doctrine, religious doctrine, creed, gospel - the written body of teachings of a religious group that are generally accepted by that group
2.dogma - a doctrine or code of beliefs accepted as authoritative; "he believed all the Marxist dogma"
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school

dogma

noun
1. blind faith, certainty, unquestioning belief, arrogant conviction freeing the country from the grip of dogma
2. doctrine, teachings, principle, opinion, article, belief, creed, tenet, precept, credo, article of faith, code of belief the dogma of the Immaculate Conception

dogma

noun
A principle taught or advanced for belief, as by a religious or philosophical group:
Translations
عَقيدَه
dogma
dogmetrossætning
dogmidoktriini
dogma
kredda; trúarkenning; kenningakerfi
dogma
dogma
dogmat
dogma
dinî inanışdogma

dogma

[ˈdɒgmə] N (dogmas or dogmata (pl)) [ˈdɒgmətə]dogma m

dogma

[ˈdɒgmə] ndogme m

dogma

nDogma nt

dogma

[ˈdɒgmə] ndogma m

dogma

(ˈdogmə) noun
opinions settled or fixed by an authority, eg the Church.
References in classic literature ?
To the last Lavalle was a Catholic of the old school, accepting--he who had looked into the very heart of the lightnings--the dogmas of papal infallibility, of absolution, of confession--of relics great and small.
She had a strange religion of transmigration of souls all her own, in which she had firm faith, troubling herself little about the dogmas of the Church.
Maybe it is easier for two nations to come to terms when the strife has arisen out of some question of material interests," said the justice of the peace; "while wars undertaken with the idea of supporting dogmas are bound to be interminable, because the object can never be clearly defined.
No bitterness or empty hate dictated his vituperations against existing values and against the dogmas of his parents and forefathers.
Though he had thrown on one side the Christian dogmas it never occurred to him to criticise the Christian ethics; he accepted the Christian virtues, and indeed thought it fine to practise them for their own sake, without a thought of reward or punishment.
I shall devote myself for a time to the examination of the Roman Catholic dogmas, and to a careful study of the workings of their system: if I find it to be, as I half suspect it is, the one best calculated to ensure the doing of all things decently and in order, I shall embrace the tenets of Rome and probably take the veil.
Grant so happily blended the universally received opinions of the Christian faith with the dogmas of his own church that, although none were entirely exempt from the influence of his reasons, very few took any alarm at the innovation.
Millward was mighty in important dogmas and sententious jokes, pompous anecdotes and oracular discourses, dealt out for the edification of the whole assembly in general, and of the admiring Mrs.
You have no warranty for such an audacious doctrine, nor any covenant to support it," cried David who was deeply tinctured with the subtle distinctions which, in his time , and more especially in his province, had been drawn around the beautiful simplicity of revelation, by endeavoring to penetrate the awful mystery of the divine nature, supplying faith by self-sufficiency, and by consequence, involving those who reasoned from such human dogmas in absurdities and doubt; "your temple is reared on the sands, and the first tempest will wash away its foundation.
In his early works there is much conventional piety, no doubt sincere so far as it goes; and he always took a strong intellectual interest in the problems of medieval theology; but he became steadily and quietly independent in his philosophic outlook and indeed rather skeptical of all definite dogmas.
Better a thousand times he should be a milksop than what he, Hunsden, calls 'a fine lad;' and moreover she says that if Hunsden were to become a fixture in the neighbourhood, and were not a mere comet, coming and going, no one knows how, when, where, or why, she should be quite uneasy till she had got Victor away to a school at least a hundred miles off; for that with his mutinous maxims and unpractical dogmas, he would ruin a score of children.
Dogma gives a charter to mistake, but the very breath of science is a contest with mistake, and must keep the conscience alive.