dogmatically


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dog·mat·ic

 (dôg-măt′ĭk, dŏg-)
adj.
1. Relating to, characteristic of, or resulting from dogma.
2.
a. Asserting or insisting upon ideas or principles, especially when unproven or unexamined, in an imperious or arrogant manner: "People in recovery groups can be dogmatic, asserting that the group's way is 'the way' or bashing other approaches" (Anne M. Fletcher).
b. Characterized by such assertion, often with an unconsidered rejection of criticism: a dogmatic adherence to a single educational model.

[Late Latin dogmaticus, from Greek dogmatikos, from dogma, dogmat-, belief; see dogma.]

dog·mat′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.dogmatically - in a narrow-minded dogmatic manner; "he is a dogmatically opinionated critic of Modern Art"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
عَقائِدياً، بِلَهْجَةٍ جازِمَه
dogmaticky
dogmatiskt
dogmatikailag
á kreddukenndan hátt
dogmaticky
dogmatik olarakolduğu gibi

dogmatically

[dɒgˈmætɪkəlɪ] ADVdogmáticamente
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

dogmatically

[dɒgˈmætɪkəli] adv [assert, state, dismiss] → de manière dogmatique
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

dogmatically

advdogmatisch
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

dogmatically

[dɒgˈmætɪklɪ] adv (see adj) → dogmaticamente, con tono autoritario
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

dogmatic

(dogˈmӕtik) adjective
tending to force one's own opinions on other people. He's very dogmatic on this subject.
dogˈmatically adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
"Consul," remarked the detective, dogmatically, "great robbers always resemble honest folks.
They sat on through the passing glory of the day, talking as lovers are prone to talk, marvelling at the wonder of love and at destiny that had flung them so strangely together, and dogmatically believing that they loved to a degree never attained by lovers before.
"Half of what the world says are lies," he pronounced dogmatically. "For all his majesty he may be a good enough man.
I do not wish to say dogmatically that the difference is irreducible; I think it highly probable that it is not.
'Quite unpossible to identify any gen'l'm'n vith any degree o' mental satisfaction, vithout lookin' at him, Sir,' replied the voice dogmatically.
In their intimacy of back yard and front gar- den he talked with her paternally, reasonably, and dogmatically, with a touch of arbitrariness.
"A grinning, information fellow," pronounced old Hagberd dogmatically, in measured tones.
"That's a lie!" repeated the restaurateur, dogmatically; "that's a - hiccup!
"What was the most remarkable about Powell," he enunciated dogmatically with his head in a cloud of smoke, "is that he should have had just that name.
"The Doctor sees the good in every one, and appreciates it," said the master dogmatically; "but I hope East will get a good colonel.
"You should feed your cold," Mrs Verloc said dogmatically.
"It is not life," he delivered himself dogmatically. "In life little girl die or get well.