dogmatism


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dog·ma·tism

 (dôg′mə-tĭz′əm, dŏg′-)
n.
Arrogant, stubborn assertion of opinion or belief.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dog•ma•tism

(ˈdɔg məˌtɪz əm, ˈdɒg-)

n.
dogmatic assertion in matters of opinion.
[1595–1605; < French < Late Latin]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

dogmatism

1. a statement of a point of view as if it were an established fact.
2. the use of a system of ideas based upon insufficiently examined premises. — dogmatist, n.dogmatic, adj.
See also: Argumentation
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dogmatism - the intolerance and prejudice of a bigot
intolerance - unwillingness to recognize and respect differences in opinions or beliefs
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

dogmatism

noun arrogance, presumption, arbitrariness, imperiousness, peremptoriness, dictatorialness, opinionatedness Dogmatism cannot stand in the way of progress.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

dogmatism

[ˈdɒgmətɪzəm] Ndogmatismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

dogmatism

[ˈdɒgmətɪzəm] ndogmatisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

dogmatism

nDogmatismus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
Rebecca had had to stand on a chair to reach them; now she could do it by stretching; and this is symbolic of the way in which she unconsciously scaled the walls of Miss Miranda's dogmatism and prejudice.
During the remainder of the journey the licentiate held forth to them on the excellences of the sword, with such conclusive arguments, and such figures and mathematical proofs, that all were convinced of the value of the science, and Corchuelo cured of his dogmatism.
There was nothing to object to in his intelligence but a little dogmatism maybe.
His gentleness was never tinged by dogmatism, and his instructions were given with an air of frankness and good nature that banished every idea of pedantry.
Their logomachy was far more stimulating to his intellect than the reserved and quiet dogmatism of Mr.
It has been often remarked that Descartes, having begun by dismissing all presuppositions, introduces several: he passes almost at once from scepticism to dogmatism. It is more important for the illustration of Plato to observe that he, like Plato, insists that God is true and incapable of deception (Republic)--that he proceeds from general ideas, that many elements of mathematics may be found in him.
[Footnote: Macaulay's well-known essay on Bacon is marred by Macaulay's besetting faults of superficiality and dogmatism and is best left unread.] Francis Bacon, intellectually one of the most eminent Englishmen of all times, and chief formulator of the methods of modern science, was born in 1561 (three years before Shakspere), the son of Sir Nicholas Bacon, Lord Keeper of the Great Seal under Queen Elizabeth and one of her most trusted earlier advisers.
Christianity is rightly dear to the best of mankind; yet was there never a young philosopher whose breeding had fallen into the Christian church by whom that brave text of Paul's was not specially prized:--"Then shall also the Son be subject unto Him who put all things under him, that God may be all in all." Let the claims and virtues of persons be never so great and welcome, the instinct of man presses eagerly onward to the impersonal and illimitable, and gladly arms itself against the dogmatism of bigots with this generous word out of the book itself.
"And do you then believe," said the Doctor a little provoked by the dogmatism of his stubborn adversary, and perhaps, secretly, too confident in his own more liberal, though scarcely as profitable, attainments,--"do you then believe that all these beasts were literally collected in a garden, to be enrolled in the nomenclature of the first man?"
As to any certainty that a particular method of treatment would either save or kill, Lydgate himself was constantly arguing against such dogmatism; he had no right to speak, and he had every motive for being silent.
Cronbach's Alpha Coefficients of the Scales Scale Cronbach's Alpha ([alpha]) Western Measures (overall) 0.89 Mach IV Scale 0.76 Short Dogmatism Scale 0.64 Locus of Control Scale 0.73 Intolerance of Ambiguity Scale 0.70 Chinese Values Survey (Overall) 0.92 Integration (CVS I) 0.69 Confucian Dynamism (CVS II) 0.67 Human Heartedness (CVS III) 0.66 Moral Discipline (CVSIV) 0.62 Social Desirability Scale 0.77 Table 2.
Wood is aware, of course, that his position puts him out of step with current theoretical fashion and that many would dismiss him, and those like him, as suffering from "a severe case of historical amnesia or ideological dogmatism" (194).