dogs


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Related to dogs: Docs

dog

 (dôg, dŏg)
n.
1. A domesticated carnivorous mammal (Canis familiaris syn. Canis lupus subsp. familiaris) occurring as a wide variety of breeds, many of which are traditionally used for hunting, herding, drawing sleds, and other tasks, and are kept as pets.
2. Any of various carnivorous mammals of the family Canidae, such as the dingo.
3. A male animal of the family Canidae, especially of a fox or a domesticated breed.
4. Any of various other animals, such as the prairie dog.
5. Informal
a. A person: You won, you lucky dog.
b. A person regarded as contemptible: You stole my watch, you dog.
6. Slang
a. A person regarded as unattractive or uninteresting.
b. Something of inferior or low quality: "The President had read the speech to some of his friends and they told him it was a dog" (John P. Roche).
c. An investment that produces a low return or a loss.
7. dogs Slang The feet.
8. See andiron.
9. Slang A hot dog; a wiener.
10. Any of various hooked or U-shaped metallic devices used for gripping or holding heavy objects.
11. Astronomy A sundog.
adv.
Totally; completely. Often used in combination: dog-tired.
tr.v. dogged, dog·ging, dogs
1. To track or trail persistently: "A stranger then is still dogging us" (Arthur Conan Doyle).
2. To hold or fasten with a mechanical device: "Watertight doors and hatches were dropped into place and dogged down to give the ship full watertight integrity" (Tom Clancy).
3.
a. To be persistently or inescapably associated with: Questions about his youthful indiscretions dogged him throughout his career.
b. To be recurrently or persistently in the mind; haunt: Despair dogged him in his final years.
Idioms:
dog it Slang
To fail to expend the effort needed to do or accomplish something.
go to the dogs
To go to ruin; degenerate.
put on the dog Informal
To make an ostentatious display of elegance, wealth, or culture.

[Middle English dogge, cur, ordinary dog (often as opposed to a hunting hound or other valuable dog), from Old English docga, dog, perhaps originally a diminutive or a hypocorism meaning "Darky, Dusky," from dox, dark, dusky (for the formation, compare Old English frox, frog, and frogga, frog, perhaps originally a diminutive).]

dogs

(dɒɡz)
pl n
1. (Gambling, except Cards) the dogs informal Brit greyhound racing
2. slang the feet
3. (Marketing) marketing informal goods with a low market share, which are unlikely to yield substantial profits
4. go to the dogs informal to go to ruin physically or morally
5. let sleeping dogs lie to leave things undisturbed
6. throw someone to the dogs to abandon someone to criticism or attack

Dogs

(dɒɡz)
n
(Placename) Isle of Dogs a district in the East End of London, bounded on three sides by the River Thames, and a focus of major office development (Canary Wharf) in recent years

Dogs

See also animals.

Psychiatry. a delusion in which a person believes himself to be a dog.
a specialist in the care and breeding of dogs.
the branch of zoology that studies the dog, especially its natural history.
an abnormal love of dogs.
an intense dread of dogs.
the state or quality of being a mixed breed. — mongrelization, n. — mongrely, adj.
the love of dogs. Also called philocyny. — philocynic, n., adj.philocynical, adj.
References in classic literature ?
Vixen sympathetically joined her shrill little yap to the bull-terrier's despairing cry, and I was annoyed, for I knew that a man who cares for dogs is one thing, but a man who loves one dog is quite another.
But some people grow fond of dogs not worth a cut of the whip.
Since all black men's dogs were cowards, all the breeding of all black men's dogs would produce cowards.
And, unlike the mere bush dogs, who stole shelter from the rain under overhanging eaves, Jerry was given a dry place under the roof where the heads of bushmen and of forgotten sandalwood traders hung down from above in the midst of a dusty confusion of dried viscera of sharks, crocodile skulls, and skeletons of Solomons rats that measured two-thirds of a yard in length from bone-tip of nose to bone-tip of tail.
And thereupon the dogs fell upon the judges and the whole council, seized some by the legs, others by the nose, and threw them so high into the air that they fell and were smashed into pieces.
Then they put the Soldier into the King's coach, and the three dogs danced in front, crying 'Hurrah
Down the frozen waterway toiled a string of wolfish dogs.
Half-way down the long, low snow passage or tunnel that led to the inner door of the house you could hear snappings and yelpings, as the dogs of his sleigh-team, released from the day's work, scuffled for warm places.
Dag Daughtry knew, instinctively to be sure, how to get on with dogs.
These men wanted dogs, and the dogs they wanted were heavy dogs, with strong muscles by which to toil, and furry coats to protect them from the frost.
On the river, where was a packed trail and where snowshoes were unnecessary, the dogs averaged six miles an hour.
So the Wolf and the Dog went towards the town together.