dogskin

dogskin

(ˈdɒɡˌskɪn)
n
the skin of a dog, or leather made from this skin
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
This personage, who had taken the train at Elko, was tall and dark, with black moustache, black stockings, a black silk hat, a black waistcoat, black trousers, a white cravat, and dogskin gloves.
When the sledges had gone she went up the path in her white dogskin coat.
'Probably he is barricading himself in from me!' she thought with a smile, and throwing off her white dogskin cloak she tried to take off her cap, which had become entangled in her hair and in the woven kerchief she was wearing under it.
The ladies wrapped up in their white dogskins. The drivers disputed as to whose troyka should go ahead, and the youngest, seating himself sideways with a dashing air, swung his long knout and shouted to the horses.
She wore dogskin gloves, with gauntlets that protected her wrists.
Uncle rushed out and bought a pair of dogskin gloves, some ugly, thick shoes, and an umbrella, and got shaved `a la mutton chop, the first thing.
And as the bobtailed, long-necked chest- nut, trying to get his head, jerked the left hand, covered by a thick dogskin glove, the doctor raised his voice over the hedge: "How's your child, Amy?"
Toward the beginning of The Good Soldier, when the narrator, John Dowell, is describing his first meeting with Leonora Ashburnham, he remarks that while "certain women's lines guide your eyes to their necks, their eyelashes, their lips, their breasts," Leonora's "[lines] seemed to conduct your gaze always to her wrist." Although Dowell finds the shape of Leonora's wrist attractive its in own right, especially when set off by "a black or dogskin glove," he also suggests that the viewers eye is drawn to her wrist because of her choice of jewelry and that jewelry's possible significance.
Maori women, as textile workers, already conveyed message and meaning in cloak-making, for example, through use of fibres, feathers, dogskin, taniko pattern and colour.
Nana the dog - aka Alexander Brunati (who also plays a rather becoming mermaid in a waist-length blonde wig and a sequined fish tail) - hurries to his entrance point in his dogskin with his head under his arm.
It is not the language of a rhetorically empty aesthetic performance, such as that of the Vicar's in the Dogskin play.