justice

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jus·tice

 (jŭs′tĭs)
n.
1. The quality of being just; fairness: In the interest of justice, we should treat everyone the same.
2.
a. The principle of moral rightness; decency.
b. Conformity to moral rightness in action or attitude; righteousness: argued for the justice of his cause.
3.
a. The attainment of what is just, especially that which is fair, moral, right, merited, or in accordance with law: My client has not received justice in this hearing.
b. Law The upholding of what is just, especially fair treatment and due reward in accordance with honor, standards, or law: We seek justice in this matter from the court.
c. The administration, system, methods, or procedures of law: a conspiracy to obstruct justice; a miscarriage of justice.
4. Conformity to truth, fact, or sound reason: The overcharged customer was angry, and with justice.
5. Abbr. J. Law A judge on the highest court of a government, such as a judge on the US Supreme Court.
Idiom:
do justice to
To treat adequately, fairly, or with full appreciation: The subject is so complex that I cannot do justice to it in a brief survey.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin iūstitia, from iūstus, just; see just1.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

justice

(ˈdʒʌstɪs)
n
1. the quality or fact of being just
2. (Philosophy) ethics
a. the principle of fairness that like cases should be treated alike
b. a particular distribution of benefits and burdens fairly in accordance with a particular conception of what are to count as like cases
c. the principle that punishment should be proportionate to the offence
3. (Law) the administration of law according to prescribed and accepted principles
4. (Law) conformity to the law; legal validity
5. (Professions) a judge of the Supreme Court of Judicature
6. (Professions) short for justice of the peace
7. good reason (esp in the phrase with justice): he was disgusted by their behaviour, and with justice.
8. do justice to
a. to show to full advantage: the picture did justice to her beauty.
b. to show full appreciation of by action: he did justice to the meal.
c. to treat or judge fairly
9. do oneself justice to make full use of one's abilities
10. (Law) bring to justice to capture, try, and usually punish (a criminal, an outlaw, etc)
[C12: from Old French, from Latin jūstitia, from justus just]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

jus•tice

(ˈdʒʌs tɪs)

n.
1. the quality of being just; righteousness, equitableness, or moral rightness.
2. rightfulness or lawfulness, as of a claim: to complain with justice.
3. justness of ground or reason.
4. the quality of being true or correct.
5. the moral principle determining just conduct.
6. conformity to this principle, as manifested in conduct; just dealing or treatment: to seek justice.
7. the administering of deserved punishment or reward.
8. the maintenance or administration of what is just according to law: a court of justice.
9. judgment of individuals or causes by judicial process: to administer justice.
10. a judicial officer; a judge or magistrate.
Idioms:
1. bring to justice, to cause to come before a court for trial or to receive punishment for one's misdeeds.
2. do justice to,
a. to act fairly toward.
b. to appreciate properly.
c. to reflect or express the worth of properly.
[1150–1200; Middle English < Old French < Latin jūstitia=jūst(us) just1 + -itia -ice]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

justice

  • high court - A supreme court of justice.
  • attain - First meant "bring to justice."
  • revenge, justice - Revenge is personal and justice is societal.
  • blind justice - The Greek statue for justice is wearing a blindfold so she cannot see the bribes being offered to her, hence blind justice.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Justice

 
  1. Even, it [justice] is as the sun on a flat plain; uneven, it strikes like the sun on a thicket —Malay proverb
  2. Injustice … gathers like dust under everything —Rainer Maria Rilke
  3. Just as a sentence meted out by a kangaroo court —Anon
  4. Justice … inevitable as the law of cause and effect —L. P. Hartley
  5. Justice is like a train that’s nearly always late —Yevgeny Yevtushenko
  6. Justice is like the kingdom of God; it is not without us as a fact, it is within us as a great yearning —George Eliot
  7. Shed justice like paladins —Jonathan Valin
  8. The tongue of the just is as choice silver —The Holy Bible/Proverbs
  9. An unrectified case of injustice has a terrible way of lingering … like an unfinished equation —Mary McCarthy
  10. We will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream —Martin Luther King Jr., speech, June 15, 1963

    This is from King’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech.

  11. Your righteousness is like the mighty mountains. Your judgments are like the great deep —The Holy Bible/Psalms

    ‘Your’ replaces the biblical ‘thy.’

Similes Dictionary, 1st Edition. © 1988 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.justice - the quality of being just or fairjustice - the quality of being just or fair  
righteousness - adhering to moral principles
fairness, equity - conformity with rules or standards; "the judge recognized the fairness of my claim"
natural virtue - (scholasticism) one of the four virtues (prudence, justice, fortitude, and temperance) derived from nature
rightfulness, right - anything in accord with principles of justice; "he feels he is in the right"; "the rightfulness of his claim"
unjustness, injustice - the practice of being unjust or unfair
2.justice - judgment involved in the determination of rights and the assignment of rewards and punishments
judicature, administration - the act of meting out justice according to the law
judgment, assessment, judgement - the act of judging or assessing a person or situation or event; "they criticized my judgment of the contestants"
prejudice - disadvantage by prejudice
3.justice - a public official authorized to decide questions brought before a court of justicejustice - a public official authorized to decide questions brought before a court of justice
adjudicator - a person who studies and settles conflicts and disputes
alcalde - a mayor or chief magistrate of a Spanish town
chief justice - the judge who presides over a supreme court
Daniel - a wise and upright judge; "a Daniel come to judgment" -- Shakespeare
doge - formerly the chief magistrate in the republics of Venice and Genoa
justiciar, justiciary - formerly a high judicial officer
magistrate - a lay judge or civil authority who administers the law (especially one who conducts a court dealing with minor offenses)
functionary, official - a worker who holds or is invested with an office
ordinary - a judge of a probate court
praetor, pretor - an annually elected magistrate of the ancient Roman Republic
qadi - an Islamic judge
recorder - a barrister or solicitor who serves as part-time judge in towns or boroughs
trial judge - a judge in a trial court
trier - one (as a judge) who examines and settles a case
4.justice - the United States federal department responsible for enforcing federal laws (including the enforcement of all civil rights legislation)Justice - the United States federal department responsible for enforcing federal laws (including the enforcement of all civil rights legislation); created in 1870
legislation, statute law - law enacted by a legislative body
executive department - a federal department in the executive branch of the government of the United States
BJA, Bureau of Justice Assistance - the bureau in the Department of Justice that assists local criminal justice systems to reduce or prevent crime and violence and drug abuse
BJS, Bureau of Justice Statistics - the agency in the Department of Justice that is the primary source of criminal justice statistics for federal and local policy makers
FBI, Federal Bureau of Investigation - a federal law enforcement agency that is the principal investigative arm of the Department of Justice
DEA, Drug Enforcement Administration, Drug Enforcement Agency - federal agency responsible for enforcing laws and regulations governing narcotics and controlled substances; goal is to immobilize drug trafficking organizations
BoP, Federal Bureau of Prisons - the law enforcement agency of the Justice Department that operates a nationwide system of prisons and detention facilities to incarcerate inmates sentenced to imprisonment for federal crimes
National Institute of Justice, NIJ - the law enforcement agency that is the research and development branch of the Department of Justice
Marshals, United States Marshals Service, US Marshals Service - the United States' oldest federal law enforcement agency is responsible today for protecting the Federal Judiciary and transporting federal prisoners and protecting federal witnesses and managing assets seized from criminals and generally ensuring the effective operation of the federal judicial system
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

justice

noun
2. fairness, legitimacy, reasonableness, justness, right, integrity, honesty, legality, rectitude, rightfulness We must win people round to the justice of our cause.
3. law A lawyer is part of the machinery of justice.
4. judge, magistrate, beak (Brit. slang), His, Her or Your Honour a justice on the Supreme Court
Related words
fear dikephobia
Quotations
"It is better that ten guilty persons escape than one innocent suffer" [William Blackstone Commentaries]
"Justice is conscience, not a personal conscience but the conscience of the whole of humanity" [Alexander Solzhenitsyn Letter to three students]
"Justice should not only be done, but should manifestly and undoubtedly be seen to be done" [Lord Hewart]
"For me, justice is the first condition of humanity" [Wole Soyinka The Man Died]
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

justice

noun
2. The state, action, or principle of treating all persons equally in accordance with the law:
3. A public official who decides cases brought before a court of law in order to administer justice:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
عَدَالَةٌعَدالَهقاضٍمَحْكَمَة العَدْل
spravedlnostsoudsoudce
retfærdighedretssagdommer
oikeudenmukaisuus
pravdapravo
igazságosságigazságszolgáltatáspártatlanságtörvényszéki bíró
dómaridómstóllréttlæti
正義
정의
būtų teisingaįstatymaipasirodyti geriausiai
taisnībataisnīgumstiesatiesnesis
pravicapravičnostsodišče
rättvisa
ความยุติธรรม
công lý

justice

[ˈdʒʌstɪs] N
1. (Jur) → justicia f
to bring sb to justicellevar a algn ante los tribunales
2. (= fairness) → justicia f
to do o.s. justicequedar bien
to do sb justicehacer justicia a algn
this doesn't do him justice [photo etc] → no le favorece
it doesn't do justice to his skillsno está a la altura de sus capacidades
to do justice to a mealhacer los honores a una comida
3. (= person) → juez mf
Justice of the Peace (Brit) → juez mf de paz
(Lord) Chief JusticePresidente m del Tribunal Supremo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

justice

[ˈdʒʌstɪs] n
(= fairness) → justice f
to do justice to sth (= deal with adequately) → faire honneur à qch
to do o.s. justice (in exam, interview)se montrer à sa juste valeur
She didn't do herself justice → Elle ne s'est pas montrée à sa juste valeur.
to do sb justice [photo]
This photo doesn't do you justice → Cette photo ne vous avantage pas.
(= rightness) [cause, claim, argument] → bien-fondé m
(= legal provisions) → justice f
to bring sb to justice → traduire qn en justice
(= judge) → juge mf Lord Chief Justice, rough justiceJustice Department n (in US)ministère m de la JusticeJustice of the Peace njuge mf de paix
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

justice

n
(Jur) (= quality)Gerechtigkeit f; (system) → Gerichtsbarkeit f, → Justiz f; British justicebritisches Recht; is this the famous British justice?ist das die berühmte britische Gerechtigkeit?; to bring somebody to justicejdn vor Gericht bringen; court of justiceGerichtshof m, → Gericht nt; to administer justiceRecht sprechen ? poetic justice
(= fairness)Gerechtigkeit f; (of claims)Rechtmäßigkeit f; to do him justiceum ihm gegenüber gerecht zu sein, um mal fair zu sein (inf); this photograph doesn’t do her justiceauf diesem Foto ist sie nicht gut getroffen; she never does herself justicesie kommt nie richtig zur Geltung; that’s not true, you’re not doing yourself justicedas stimmt nicht, Sie unterschätzen sich; you didn’t do yourself justice in the examsSie haben im Examen nicht gezeigt, was Sie können; they did justice to the winesie wussten den Wein zu würdigen; and with justiceund (zwar) zu Recht; there’s no justice, is there?das ist doch nicht gerecht
(= judge)Richter(in) m(f); Lord Chief Justice oberster Richter in Großbritannien; Justice of the PeaceFriedensrichter(in) m(f); Mr Justice BuchananRichter Buchanan
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

justice

[ˈdʒʌstɪs] n
a. (Law) → giustizia
to bring sb to justice → consegnare qn alla giustizia
b. (fairness) in justice to her, she ...per essere giusti, lei...
she never does herself justice → non dimostra mai quello che vale
this biography doesn't do him justice → questa biografia non gli rende giustizia
this photo doesn't do you justice → questa foto non ti fa giustizia
to do justice to a meal → fare onore a un pranzo
c. (judge) → giudice m
Lord Chief Justice (Brit) → presidente m della Corte d'Appello
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

justice

(ˈdʒastis) noun
1. fairness or rightness in the treatment of other people. Everyone has a right to justice; I don't deserve to be punished – where's your sense of justice?
2. the law or the administration of it. Their dispute had to be settled in a court of justice.
3. a judge.
bring to justice
to arrest, try and sentence (a criminal). The murderer escaped but was finally brought to justice.
do (someone/something) justice / do justice to (someone/something)
1. to treat fairly or properly. It would not be doing him justice to call him lazy when he's so ill.
2. to fulfil the highest possibilities of; to get the best results from; to show fully or fairly. I was so tired that I didn't do myself justice in the exam.
in justice to (him, *heretc) / to do (him, *heretc) justice
if one must be fair (to him, her etc). To do her justice, I must admit that she was only trying to help when she broke the cup.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

justice

عَدَالَةٌ spravedlnost retfærdighed Gerechtigkeit δικαιοσύνη justicia oikeudenmukaisuus justice pravda giustizia 正義 정의 gerechtigheid rettferdighet sprawiedliwość justiça справедливость rättvisa ความยุติธรรม adalet công lý 正义
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

jus·tice

n. justicia.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

justice

n justicia
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Master Blifil fell very short of his companion in the amiable quality of mercy; but he as greatly exceeded him in one of a much higher kind, namely, in justice: in which he followed both the precepts and example of Thwackum and Square; for though they would both make frequent use of the word mercy, yet it was plain that in reality Square held it to be inconsistent with the rule of right; and Thwackum was for doing justice, and leaving mercy to heaven.
"I am only doing justice to this foolish woman," he continued, "when I tell you that she came here, after she had left Miss Emily, and did her best to set matters right.
"Do you know, I am often afraid that by not speaking of him" (she meant Prince Andrew) "for fear of not doing justice to our feelings, we forget him."
"Cecil said one day--and I thought it so profound--that there are two kinds of cads--the conscious and the subconscious." She paused again, to be sure of doing justice to Cecil's profundity.
The delicacy of her mind throughout the whole engagement, my dear madam, is much beyond my power of doing justice to.
Upon this point, I cannot forbear doing justice to the queen my mistress, and Glumdalclitch my nurse, whose persons were as sweet as those of any lady in England.
And so it ends in your spoiling canvas with paints, and making a smell in the house; or in keeping tadpoles in a glass box full of dirty water, and turning everybody's stomach in the house; or in chipping off bits of stone here, there, and everywhere, and dropping grit into all the victuals in the house; or in staining your fingers in the pursuit of photography, and doing justice without mercy on everybody's face in the house.
I'm going to earn from five to ten thousand pound by the sweat of my brow; and as a poor man doing justice to the sweat of my brow, is it likely I can afford to part with so much as my name without its being took down?'
Weller behind-hand in doing justice to the composition.
Gallant, expansive, amusing, more pleased himself with the effect he produced than those (even when they were well pleased) for whom he produced it; a master of all the distinctively social virtues and a votary of all agreeable sensations; a devotee of something mysterious and sacred to which he occasionally alluded in terms more ecstatic even than those in which he spoke of the last pretty woman, and which was simply the beautiful though somewhat superannuated image of HONOR; he was irresistibly entertaining and enlivening, and he formed a character to which Newman was as capable of doing justice when he had once been placed in contact with it, as he was unlikely, in musing upon the possible mixtures of our human ingredients, mentally to have foreshadowed it.
So here, in the course of a few years, was another thriving city, with a red freestone palace in the center of it, where Thasus sat upon a throne, doing justice to the people, with a purple robe over his shoulders, a sceptre in his hand, and a crown upon his head.
A former environment secretary, Atienza hailed the Supreme Court for doing justice to consumers, who he said had been 'abused' by the MWSS and the two distributors for more than 22 years.