dolphin


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dol·phin

 (dŏl′fĭn, dôl′-)
n. pl. dolphin or dol·phins
1.
a. Any of various marine toothed whales of the family Delphinidae, having a beaklike snout, a curved dorsal fin, and a slender streamlined body.
b. Any of several toothed whales inhabiting rivers and estuaries in South America and South Asia, having a long narrow beak, broad flippers, a flexible neck, and usually a reduced dorsal fin. A species native to the Yangtze River is thought to be extinct. Also called river dolphin.
3.
a. A buoy, pile, or group of piles used for mooring boats.
b. A group of piles used as a fender, as at a dock or around a bridge pier.

[Middle English, from Old French daulfin, blend of daufin and Old Provençal dalfin, both from Medieval Latin *dalfinus, from Latin delphīnus, from Greek delphīs, delphīn-, from delphus, womb (from its shape).]

dolphin

(ˈdɒlfɪn)
n
1. (Animals) any of various marine cetacean mammals of the family Delphinidae, esp Delphinus delphis, that are typically smaller than whales and larger than porpoises and have a beaklike snout
2. (Animals) river dolphin any freshwater cetacean of the family Platanistidae, inhabiting rivers of North and South America and S Asia. They are smaller than marine dolphins and have a longer narrower snout
3. (Animals) Also called: dorado either of two large marine percoid fishes, Coryphaena hippurus or C. equisetis, that resemble the cetacean dolphins and have an iridescent coloration
4. (Nautical Terms) nautical a post or buoy for mooring a vessel
[C13: from Old French dauphin, via Latin, from Greek delphin-, delphis]

dol•phin

(ˈdɒl fɪn, ˈdɔl-)

n.
1. any small toothed cetacean of the family Delphinidae, esp. the species having a beaklike snout. Compare porpoise.
2. Also called dolphinfish , mahimahi. either of two large, slender fishes, Coryphaena hippurus or C. equisetis, of warm and temperate seas.
3.
a. a pile, cluster of piles, or buoy to which a vessel may be moored.
b. a cluster of piles used as a fender, as at the entrance to a dock.
4. (cap.) the constellation Delphinus.
[1300–50; Middle English dolphyn < Old French daulphin « Latin delphīnus < Greek delphin]

dol·phin

(dŏl′fĭn)
1. Any of various, usually ocean-dwelling mammals having a snout shaped like a beak, forelimbs shaped like flippers, and horizontal tail flukes. Dolphins are related to but smaller than whales and are noted for their high intelligence. Compare porpoise.
2. Either of two edible fish that inhabit warm sea waters and have a fin extending along the back. Dolphins are iridescent when removed from the water.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dolphin - large slender food and game fish widely distributed in warm seas (especially around Hawaii)dolphin - large slender food and game fish widely distributed in warm seas (especially around Hawaii)
percoid, percoid fish, percoidean - any of numerous spiny-finned fishes of the order Perciformes
Coryphaenidae, family Coryphaenidae - large active pelagic percoid fish
Coryphaena hippurus - the more common dolphinfish valued as food; about six feet long
Coryphaena equisetis - a kind of dolphinfish
dolphinfish, mahimahi - the lean flesh of a saltwater fish found in warm waters (especially in Hawaii)
Aloha State, Hawaii, Hawai'i, HI - a state in the United States in the central Pacific on the Hawaiian Islands
2.dolphin - any of various small toothed whales with a beaklike snout; larger than porpoises
toothed whale - any of several whales having simple conical teeth and feeding on fish etc.
common dolphin, Delphinus delphis - black-and-white dolphin that leaps high out of the water;
bottlenose, bottlenose dolphin, bottle-nosed dolphin - any of several dolphins with rounded forehead and well-developed beak; chiefly of northern Atlantic and Mediterranean
porpoise - any of several small gregarious cetacean mammals having a blunt snout and many teeth
Grampus griseus, grampus - slaty-grey blunt-nosed dolphin common in northern seas
killer whale, orca, Orcinus orca, sea wolf, grampus, killer - predatory black-and-white toothed whale with large dorsal fin; common in cold seas
black whale, common blackfish, Globicephala melaena, pilot whale, blackfish - small dark-colored whale of the Atlantic coast of the United States; the largest male acts as pilot or leader for the school
river dolphin - any of several long-snouted usually freshwater dolphins of South America and southern Asia
Delphinapterus leucas, white whale, beluga - small northern whale that is white when adult

dolphin

noun
Related words
collective noun school
see whales and dolphins
Translations
دُلفيـندولْفين
делфин
delfín
delfinduc d'albe
delfeno
delfiini
dauphinduc-d’Albeduc-d'Albe
delfin
delfin
lumba-lumba
höfrungur
イルカ
돌고래
delphinus
delfinas
delfīns
delfín
delfin
delfin
ปลาโลมา
yunusyunus balığı
cá heo

dolphin

[ˈdɒlfɪn] Ndelfín m

dolphin

[ˈdɒlfɪn] ndauphin m

dolphin

nDelfin m, → Delphin m

dolphin

[ˈdɒlfɪn] n (Zool) → delfino

dolphin

(ˈdolfin) noun
a type of sea-animal about two and a half to three metres long, closely related to the porpoise.

dolphin

دُلفيـن delfín delfin Delphin δελφίνι delfín delfiini dauphin delfin delfino イルカ 돌고래 dolfijn delfin delfin golfinho дельфин delfin ปลาโลมา yunus cá heo 海豚
References in periodicals archive ?
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