domesticate

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do·mes·ti·cate

 (də-mĕs′tĭ-kāt′)
tr.v. do·mes·ti·cat·ed, do·mes·ti·cat·ing, do·mes·ti·cates
1. To cause to feel comfortable at home; make domestic.
2. To adopt or make fit for domestic use or life.
3.
a. To train or adapt (an animal or plant) to live in a human environment and be of use to humans.
b. To introduce and accustom (an animal or plant) into another region; naturalize.
n. (-kət, -kāt′)
A plant or animal that has been adapted to live in a human environment.

do·mes′ti·ca′tion n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

domesticate

(dəˈmɛstɪˌkeɪt) or

domesticize

vb (tr)
1. (Agriculture) to bring or keep (wild animals or plants) under control or cultivation
2. to accustom to home life
3. (Environmental Science) to adapt to an environment: to domesticate foreign trees.
doˈmesticable adj
doˌmestiˈcation n
doˈmesticative adj
doˈmestiˌcator n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

do•mes•ti•cate

(v. dəˈmɛs tɪˌkeɪt; n. -kɪt)

v. -cat•ed, -cat•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to convert (animals, plants, etc.) to domestic uses.
2. to tame (an animal), esp. by generations of breeding, to live in close association with human beings as a pet or work animal or for food, usu. compromising its ability to live in the wild.
3. to adapt (a plant) so as to be cultivated by and beneficial to human beings.
4. to accustom to household life.
5. to take (something foreign, unfamiliar, etc.) for one's own use.
v.i.
6. to adjust to domestic life.
n.
7. something, as an animal, that has been domesticated.
[1635–45; < Medieval Latin domesticātus, past participle of domesticāre, v. derivative of Latin domesticus domestic]
do•mes`ti•ca′tion, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

domesticate


Past participle: domesticated
Gerund: domesticating

Imperative
domesticate
domesticate
Present
I domesticate
you domesticate
he/she/it domesticates
we domesticate
you domesticate
they domesticate
Preterite
I domesticated
you domesticated
he/she/it domesticated
we domesticated
you domesticated
they domesticated
Present Continuous
I am domesticating
you are domesticating
he/she/it is domesticating
we are domesticating
you are domesticating
they are domesticating
Present Perfect
I have domesticated
you have domesticated
he/she/it has domesticated
we have domesticated
you have domesticated
they have domesticated
Past Continuous
I was domesticating
you were domesticating
he/she/it was domesticating
we were domesticating
you were domesticating
they were domesticating
Past Perfect
I had domesticated
you had domesticated
he/she/it had domesticated
we had domesticated
you had domesticated
they had domesticated
Future
I will domesticate
you will domesticate
he/she/it will domesticate
we will domesticate
you will domesticate
they will domesticate
Future Perfect
I will have domesticated
you will have domesticated
he/she/it will have domesticated
we will have domesticated
you will have domesticated
they will have domesticated
Future Continuous
I will be domesticating
you will be domesticating
he/she/it will be domesticating
we will be domesticating
you will be domesticating
they will be domesticating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been domesticating
you have been domesticating
he/she/it has been domesticating
we have been domesticating
you have been domesticating
they have been domesticating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been domesticating
you will have been domesticating
he/she/it will have been domesticating
we will have been domesticating
you will have been domesticating
they will have been domesticating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been domesticating
you had been domesticating
he/she/it had been domesticating
we had been domesticating
you had been domesticating
they had been domesticating
Conditional
I would domesticate
you would domesticate
he/she/it would domesticate
we would domesticate
you would domesticate
they would domesticate
Past Conditional
I would have domesticated
you would have domesticated
he/she/it would have domesticated
we would have domesticated
you would have domesticated
they would have domesticated
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.domesticate - adapt (a wild plant or unclaimed land) to the environment; "domesticate oats"; "tame the soil"
plant life, flora, plant - (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion
adapt, accommodate - make fit for, or change to suit a new purpose; "Adapt our native cuisine to the available food resources of the new country"
2.domesticate - overcome the wildness of; make docile and tractable; "He tames lions for the circus"; "reclaim falcons"
animal, animate being, beast, creature, fauna, brute - a living organism characterized by voluntary movement
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
break in, break - make submissive, obedient, or useful; "The horse was tough to break"; "I broke in the new intern"
domesticate, tame - make fit for cultivation, domestic life, and service to humans; "The horse was domesticated a long time ago"; "The wolf was tamed and evolved into the house dog"
3.domesticate - make fit for cultivation, domestic life, and service to humans; "The horse was domesticated a long time ago"; "The wolf was tamed and evolved into the house dog"
animal, animate being, beast, creature, fauna, brute - a living organism characterized by voluntary movement
adapt, accommodate - make fit for, or change to suit a new purpose; "Adapt our native cuisine to the available food resources of the new country"
domesticise, domesticize, domesticate, tame, reclaim - overcome the wildness of; make docile and tractable; "He tames lions for the circus"; "reclaim falcons"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

domesticate

verb
1. tame, break, train, house-train, gentle We domesticated the dog.
2. naturalize, accustom, familiarize, habituate, acclimatize New World peoples domesticated a cornucopia of plants.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

domesticate

verb
To train to live with and be of use to people:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
udomačiti

domesticate

[dəˈmestɪkeɪt] VT [+ wild animal] → domesticar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

domesticate

[dəˈmɛstɪkeɪt] vt (= tame) [+ animal] → domestiquer
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

domesticate

vt wild animaldomestizieren; (hum) persondomestizieren; (= house-train) dog, catstubenrein machen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

domesticate

[dəˈmɛstɪˌkeɪt] vt (animal) → addomesticare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
'In the culture and traditional customs of some Cambodian people, they live by domesticating elephants.
He urges that Liberia implements these instruments and not sit back as a nation after crafting, domesticating (localizing in the context of Liberia) and legislating the documents.
[02/June/2018] SANAA, June 2 (Saba) -- Leader of Revolution Sayyed Abdulmalek Badr Al-Din Al-Houthi on Friday warned against activities by some international organizations which he said "they operating under deceptive headlines but aimed at domesticating our nation." Sayyed Al-Houthi, in his daily Ramadan lecture broadcasting by al-Masira television channel on Friday evening, said, "the Zionists do not accept any Arab or Islamic State to be strong in a way that may threatening their military superiority." "Our nation has the right to possess power so that it can protect itself from any foreign military threat," he said.
The Neolithic period was marked by a movement from hunting and gathering to a more settled lifestyle, with prehistoric humans raising crops, domesticating animals for livestock and building communities instead of wandering from place to place.
Summary: Ancient humans made dogs their best friend not once but twice, by domesticating two separate populations of wolves thousands of miles apart in Europe and Asia.
"I strongly believe that we should still be domesticating new crops as we do in IBERS if we want to make the world a better place.
When humans began domesticating wheat sometime around 7500 BC, they most often selected plants that boasted high and consistent yields.
Al-Hasani, CEO of PEIE stated that the MoU stems from the importance of activating the food sectors in the Sultanate by domesticating of a large number of these industries in the country and re-exporting them to world countries, particularly that the number of Muslims is increasing and they need this trademark, affirming that this step will have a good a positive impact on the Sultanate.
She covers published virtues of the earth, continental contexts of the bookish nature of botanical culture, botanical reformation in William Turner's books of nature, John Gerard's uncommon ground, and domesticated plants and domesticating books: cultivating household textual collections.