domiciliary


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dom·i·cile

 (dŏm′ĭ-sīl′, -səl, dō′mĭ-)
n.
1. A residence; a home.
2. One's legal residence.
v. dom·i·ciled, dom·i·cil·ing, dom·i·ciles
v.tr.
1. To establish (oneself or another person) in a residence.
2. To provide with often temporary lodging.
v.intr.
To reside; dwell.

[Middle English domicilie, from Old French domicile, from Latin domicilium, from domus, house; see dem- in Indo-European roots.]

dom′i·cil′i·ar′y (-sĭl′ē-ĕr′ē) adj.

domiciliary

(ˌdɒmɪˈsɪlɪərɪ)
adj
of, involving, or taking place in the home

dom•i•cil•i•ar•y

(ˌdɒm əˈsɪl iˌɛr i)

adj., n., pl. -ar•ies. adj.
1. of or pertaining to a domicile.
2. given or taking place in one's home.
3. providing care for those unable to care for themselves.
n.
4. an institutional home for those unable to care for themselves.
[1780–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.domiciliary - of or relating to or provided in a domicile; "domiciliary medical care"; "domiciliary caves"
Translations

domiciliary

[ˌdɒmɪˈsɪlɪərɪ] ADJdomiciliario

domiciliary

adj carehäuslich, im Haus; domiciliary visit (of doctor)Hausbesuch m; domiciliary expensesHaushaltskosten pl

domiciliary

a. domiciliario-a, rel. a lo que se trata en el domicilio.
References in classic literature ?
Tess, like her compeers, soon discovered which of the cows had a preference for her style of manipulation, and her fingers having become delicate from the long domiciliary imprisonments to which she had subjected herself at intervals during the last two or three years, she would have been glad to meet the milchers' views in this respect.
de Bragelonne, for Madame de Saint-Remy is not over indulgent; and any indiscretion on her part might bring hither a domiciliary visit, which would be disagreeable to all parties."
Was my maternal parent aware, in a word, of my absence from the domiciliary residence?
Micawber, '- to quote a favourite expression of my friend Heep; but it may prove the stepping-stone to more ambitious domiciliary accommodation.'
Such a domiciliary invasion may be called, not only (as they say in police reports) an attack on privacy, but a burglary, a robbery of all that is most precious, namely, CREDIT.
Grosvenor Health and Social Care has bought Rainbow Services (UK), a domiciliary care business operating in South Ayrshire, Dumfries and Galloway, East Ayrshire, North Ayrshire and Falkirk.
Care At Home would provide domiciliary and respite care for adults and children, while boosting service capacity to meet future demand and minimising disruption to existing recipients of care.
(4) Many of these people will be unable to leave home unaccompanied due to physical disability or mental illness and so will be eligible for an NHS funded domiciliary sight test.
As part of new regulations being brought in by the Welsh Government today, providers are required to give domiciliary care workers a choice between a zero-hours contract or otherwise after a three-month period of employment.
Employers would be made to pay domiciliary care workers for the time spent travelling between visits in a bid to prevent 'call clipping' where visits are cut short to give time to get to the next person.
The council's in-house domiciliary care team employs 225 people costing PS3.77m in wages alone each year, while 15 residents live in independent supported accommodation - with care provided by 36 members of staff.