dominant hemisphere


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dominant hemisphere

n
(Physiology) See cerebral dominance
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References in periodicals archive ?
However, further, we found that stroke survivors with dominant hemisphere lesion were more functionally dependent than the non-dominant hemisphere stroke, but it was statistically not significant.
Involvement of the dominant hemisphere may be associated with aphasia and patients may subsequently develop intellectual impairment.4
In our previous study [5], by comparing AON of TD children with that of healthy adults, we demonstrated that lateralization of AON is age-dependent and that adults have a more lateralized activated network in the dominant hemisphere while healthy children have more bilateral and widespread AON.
While the left, dominant hemisphere of the cerebral cortex is largely involved in convergent thinking, both hemispheres are involved in the creative process (Chrysikou, 2012; Kraft, 2005).
Results: Aphasia is the linguistic disability, which usually results from injuries to the dominant hemisphere of the brain.
Demographic and clinical characteristics of patients Characteristics n % Mean [+ or -] SD Age (years) 65.8 [+ or -] 16.2 Sex Male 34 66.7 Female 17 33.3 Marital status Married 34 66.7 Single-Widow 17 33.3 Level of education Ungraduated 3 5.9 Primary-High school 31 60.8 University 17 33.3 Interval between stroke and urodynamic assessment (days) 396.9 [+ or -] 713.8 Type of lesion Hemorrhagic 15 29.4 Ischemic 36 70.6 Laterality Right 18 35.3 Left 30 58.8 Bilateral 3 5.9 Comorbidities Hypertension 30 58.8 Diabetes 14 27.5 Smoking 19 37.3 Neglect 6 11.8 Aphasia 21 42.2 Dominant hemisphere Left 50 98.0 Right 1 2.0 Vesical ultrasonography Normal in male 14 41.2 Normal in female 14 82.4 SD: Standard deviation.
Three types of language lateralization were extablished from the images obtained; 'typical' with a dominant left hemisphere (present in 88% of right-handers and 78% of left-handers), 'ambilateral' without a clearly dominant hemisphere (present in 12% of right-handers and 15% of left-handers), and 'strongly atypical' with a dominant right hemisphere (present only in 7% of left-handers).