dominant seventh chord


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dominant seventh chord

n
(Music, other) a chord consisting of the dominant and the major third, perfect fifth, and minor seventh above it. Its most natural resolution is to a chord on the tonic
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One, entitled "Scat and Interpretation," contains exercises for scatting--even for choosing syllables--as well as singing exercises based on the blues scale and the dominant seventh chord.
Then another seventh chord follows, this time a dominant seventh chord (bars 10/18), which naturally leads to the tonic, respectively G and C.
This allows for the melody to begin on a dominant seventh chord in m.
The A[natural] in measure 9 forms set class 4-27 (0258) with its accompanying pitch classes, E[flat], F, and C--this dominant seventh chord is a transposition of B[flat] D F A[flat] and a transposed inversion of D F A[flat] C, both subsets of the referential collection.
Smith also tries to synthesize different philosophical ideas, including Hegel's "force," Schopenhauer's "will," and Freud's drive theory, to explain the unresolved dominant seventh chords that open the piece (pp.
Chapter 3 is also organized like Chapter 1, but uses the blues scale and dominant seventh chords.
By doing this, the sound of the progression will become familiar along with the visualization of the three note voicings of the dominant seventh chords shown in example 1.
The ravishing "Colloque au Clair de Lune" by Pick-Mangiagalli, with its melody and accompaniment texture, voicing challenges, and abundant dominant seventh chords is aligned with 19th-century romanticism.
Acknowledging Forte's observation that the occurrence in this piece of tonally nonfunctional dominant seventh chords represents an early use of octatonic structures that would become more prevalent in the early years of the twentieth century ("Liszt's Experimental Idiom and Music of the Early Twentieth Century," 19th-Century Music 11 [1987]: 210), Morgan attempts to place these and other features of the work into a more comprehensive tonal context.
Delage makes frequent use of dominant seventh chords in the accompaniment, contributing to harmonic color not heard in the composer's earlier works.
The use of multiple dominant seventh chords and alternating major and minor tonalities are ultimately resolved with a lovely C major chord.
Certainly the forty-five different ways of fingering dominant seventh chords on E are unlikely to have bothered the average player of the instrument at the height of its popularity.