dominoes


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domino1

dom·i·no 1

 (dŏm′ə-nō′)
n. pl. dom·i·noes or dom·i·nos
1.
a. A small rectangular wood or plastic block, the face of which is divided into halves, each half being blank or marked by dots resembling those on dice.
b. dominoes or dominos(used with a sing. or pl. verb) A game played with a set of these small blocks, generally 28 in number.
2. A country expected to react politically to events as predicted by the domino theory: "The dominos did indeed fall in Indochina" (Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.).

[French, probably from domino, mask, perhaps because of the resemblance between the eyeholes and the spots on some of the tiles; see domino2.]

dom·i·no 2

 (dŏm′ə-nō′)
n. pl. dom·i·noes or dom·i·nos
1.
a. A costume consisting of a hooded robe worn with an eye mask at a masquerade.
b. The mask so worn.
2. One wearing this costume.

[French, probably from Latin (benedīcāmus) dominō, (let us praise) the Lord, dative of dominus, lord; see dem- in Indo-European roots.]

dominoes

(ˈdɒmɪˌnəʊz)
n
(Games, other than specified) (functioning as singular) any of several games in which matching halves of dominoes are laid together
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dominoes - any of several games played with small rectangular blocksdominoes - any of several games played with small rectangular blocks
table game - a game that is played on a table
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Some reading was done, and much smoking and sewing, though not by the same parties; there were the monsters of the deep to be looked after and wondered at; strange ships had to be scrutinized through opera-glasses, and sage decisions arrived at concerning them; and more than that, everybody took a personal interest in seeing that the flag was run up and politely dipped three times in response to the salutes of those strangers; in the smoking room there were always parties of gentlemen playing euchre, draughts and dominoes, especially dominoes, that delightfully harmless game; and down on the main deck, "for'rard"-- for'rard of the chicken-coops and the cattle--we had what was called "horse billiards.
Then Jake and I played dominoes, while Otto wrote a long letter home to his mother.
From every street and every corner drove carriages filled with clowns, harlequins, dominoes, mummers, pantomimists, Transteverins, knights, and peasants, screaming, fighting, gesticulating, throwing eggs filled with flour, confetti, nosegays, attacking, with their sarcasms and their missiles, friends and foes, companions and strangers, indiscriminately, and no one took offence, or did anything but laugh.
Browning might say, as his wife said in an early preface, I never mistook pleasure for the final cause of poetry, nor leisure for the hour of the poet--as indeed he has himself said, to much the same effect, in a letter printed many years ago: I never pretended to offer such literature as should be a substitute for a cigar or a game at dominoes to an idle man.