doolie

doolie

(ˈduːlɪ)
n
(Medicine) archaic a simple stretcher on poles for carrying the wounded or ill
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References in classic literature ?
"Not going out this journey," gasped Bobby, as he was lifted from the doolie. "Not going out this journey." Then with an air of supreme conviction - "I can't, you see."
1) allows its viewer to catch a glimpse of how women such as Asghari and Mahmuda, occasionally traversing through the city, might have seen the "Qutb sahib's ruins"36 from their doolie. It is important to note that towards the bottom center of the painting lie a pile of stones.
This set of ideas seemed quite at odds with the treatment a "doolie" like myself typically received in those days at the Academy, but in the end, those words and their value to me stuck.
Or worse than a serf--you become a "doolie," from the Greek doulos, meaning: slave.
Terror also infects the delirious speaker of Kipling's "After the Fever or Natural Theology in a Doolie," a dramatic monologue in which Kipling tackles Browning's philosophico-religious concerns by invoking not one, but three, of his predecessor's poems.
Bala, who died two days earlier, was a doolie (stretcher) bearer and Kallu, who died on March 24th, 1915, was a saddler with the 11th Mule Corps.
The first classes boasted very high achievers, and almost from the outset a far greater proportion of women than men made the intercollegiate squads, thus escaping the usual Doolie (i.e., freshman) training at meals.
We see this happen to "Doolie" in the passage from Junky cited above: "viscera and cells galvanized into a loathsome insect-like activity." Marks and confidence men commit the same kinds of acts and suffer the same kinds of fate.
Seventy- six-year-old Doolie Keele-Woolfe lived there, and loved it.
The Penang Hill funicular railway can be traced back to the 1890s when visitors and residents used ponies, horse carriages and doolies to go up the hill.
It was initially called Doolies Bakery before being renamed in January 2018.
Upperclassmen hector plebes and doolies (an Air Force Academy nickname for freshman, derived from the ancient Greek doulos, or slave), an experience that is notorious but far from pointless.