doomsaying


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doomsaying

(ˈduːmˌseɪɪŋ)
n
the act of prophesying doom
References in periodicals archive ?
Ehrlich's doomsaying struck a responsive chord with the intellectual elites of the day and helped spawn massive and draconian efforts at population control.
Calling himself "a 10 on long-term optimism," Buffett waved off economic doomsaying.
Raw Deal offers a dense, often provocative mashup of interesting facts, opinions, history, capitalism bashing, union worship, Internet startup tales, paeans to Euro-socialism, examples of both real and imagined workplace injustice, petty name calling, macroeconomic doomsaying, and more.
But for all the doomsaying, Nixon's China opening turned out to be hugely significant.
He also addresses his penchant for doomsaying, saying those 10 topics "can all be viewed as problems: potential threats to our well-being.
Just when it seems the worst is over for the Gaines family, a doomsaying professor (Paul Giamatti) at California Institute of Technology predicts a bigger earthquake and a massive tsunami from which there will be no escape.
He concludes (optimistically and with too much complacency) that after nearly three decades of doomsaying, what do we have?
Economists call the 1970s the "disastrous decade," but those were the glory years for a doomsaying magazine editor and organic farmer and his family.
Those futures, with their emphasis on design principles, on public engagement, on interconnection, and on collaboration, are far brighter than any of the doomsaying pundits lamenting the humanities' decline into irrelevance have yet grasped.
The book debunks the doomsaying that is so prevalent today.
Americans for Prosperity's doomsaying notwithstanding, Arkansas is still a land of opportunity.