French door

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French door

n.
A door, usually one of a pair, of light construction with glass panes extending for most of its length.

French′ door′


n.
a door having glass panes throughout its length, usu. hung in pairs.
[1920–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.French door - a light door with transparent or glazed panels extending the full lengthFrench door - a light door with transparent or glazed panels extending the full length
door - a swinging or sliding barrier that will close the entrance to a room or building or vehicle; "he knocked on the door"; "he slammed the door as he left"
French window - a French door situated in an exterior wall of a building
flexible joint, hinge - a joint that holds two parts together so that one can swing relative to the other
References in periodicals archive ?
Thieves smashed the driver's door window on a Peugeot camper van to steal a monitor screen during the evening of September 13 after the vehicle was parked on Barcroft Road.
Finally, for MIII4s with the Frag 5 kit, the door window assembly comes with NSN 251100-01-545-5856.
The thief broke the rear door window and stole the money.
A brick smashed through a door window, sending razor-sharp slivers of glass into a woman's eye, and hitting another female passenger.
The rear door window of the Peugeot was smashed and a handbag was stolen.
The woman, who has not been named but is in her 40s, is understood to have attempted to lean through the driver's door window to pull on the handbrake but lost her footing as the vehicle started to roll away when she got out in Dene Drive.
In several works, for example, the artist borrows objects from his 1974 "Door Window Table Basket Mirror Rug" series, relocating the drawings' woven basket into a distorted and slightly creepy dungeonlike interior in Walking Man, and isolating the "old" rug in a perceptual tug-of-war between flatness and perspectival depth in Rug II (both 2004).
The two men broke into the shop in the village hall, in Church Lane, at around 4.15am, after smashing a door window.
The court noted that jail officials did not know about the problem, and that once the inmate made them aware of it, they investigated and mitigated the problem by placing a removable piece of magnetic paper over the lower door window. The court found that the officials did not know about the problem until the inmate submitted a grievance in September 2002, although the inmate would have previously had access to the jail supervisors on their daily tours of the facility three times each day, providing him with 51 opportunities to raise the issue before he filed his grievance.