doorstepper

doorstepper

(ˈdɔːˌstɛpə)
n
a person who goes from door-to-door in order to canvass or interview
References in periodicals archive ?
In my prehistoric days as a doorstepper, 'earwigging' was the best tool in a reporter's armoury.
And not only did the doorstepper want the letter posted but also made a request for a first-class stamp.
His minder used to provide a similar service for veteran TV doorstepper Roger Cook.
DOORSTEPPERS DUP leader Arlene Foster and her deputy Nigel Dodds at 10 Downing Street.
Contrary to public opinion there are some bright lads out there, and instead of being terrified of the media they should be encouraged to embrace the sporting press (and I'm not talking red-top doorsteppers here) and go through media training.
Annually, around pounds 1bn euros are spent on corporate lobbying activities in the city, which is home to more than 2,600 special interest groups and 15,000 professional political doorsteppers.
To beat bin-raiders always make sure you shred receipts, bank statements, utility bills or any other personal documents before binning them, and never give personal or financial details to phone 'cold callers' or doorsteppers.
The scheme is part of a wider Stockton Doorsteppers Initiative, involving Stockton's Adult Protection, Victim Support, Trading Standards and Licensing Services, Stockton Home Safety Association, Community Service volunteers, Stockton Crime Prevention and Cleveland Strongbow Team.
The rows, the family scandals, the warmth and the unvarnished reality of life with the Wilkins meant that they, their offspring and their daughters' boyfriends were soon as well-known as the cast of Coronation Street, and a family wedding shown late in the series was beseiged by onlookers, fans and Fleet Street's finest doorsteppers.
Also a shift rota may be introduced so that the doorsteppers call on people outside of working hours - to maximise the chance of getting hold of residents.