dormitive

dormitive

(ˈdɔːmɪtɪv)
adj
having the effect of inducing sleep
References in periodicals archive ?
8: "From our point of view, explaining the success of science, or the desirability of political liberalism, by talk of "fitting the world" or "expressing human nature" is like explaining why opium makes you sleepy by talking about its dormitive power.
The unedifying spectacle of dormitive lecturers routinely condemning a concept which their own practice and social/ intellectual positioning exemplifies is especially poignant.
All that smacks of the famous vertu dormitive de l'opium.
One might object that to say that a perception is noticed because it is noticeable has the ring of dormitive virtue to it.
But this is the same illusion as supposing that ascribing a dormitive virtue to a sleeping draught tells us why it induces slumber.
41) Adverting to such properties (fragility, dormitive powers, etc.
It is the dormitive virtue of opium that induces sleep,
The reason we should reject the would-be explanation that it is the dormitive virtue of opium that induces sleep is that it is circular, though Miller does not point this out.
The classic explanation of this type, of course, is Moliere's explanation that opium puts us to sleep because it has a dormitive power.