dot-com

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dot-com

 (dŏt′kŏm′)
adj.
1. Of or relating to business conducted on the internet: dot-com advertising.
2. Of or relating to a company whose products or services deal with or are sold on the internet: a dot-com brokerage firm.
n.
A dot-com company.

[Pronunciation of .com.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dot-com - a company that operates its business primarily on the internet using a URL that ends in `.com'dot-com - a company that operates its business primarily on the internet using a URL that ends in `.com'
company - an institution created to conduct business; "he only invests in large well-established companies"; "he started the company in his garage"
Adj.1.dot-com - of or relating to an internet company; "a dot-com outfit in San Francisco"
Translations

dot-com

dot com, dot.com [ˌdɒtˈkɒm]
n (= company) → point-com m
modif [boom, explosion, crash, era] → du point-com dot-com companydot-com company dot.com company nsociété f point-comdot command n (COMPUTING)commande f précédée d'un point
dote on
vt fus [+ person] → être fou de(folle)
References in periodicals archive ?
“And to be here for the beginning of the second wave of dot-coms, remembering what we all learned back in 2001, creates an incredible opportunity for dot-com entrepreneurs and The Idea People to partner to create strong, vibrant, niche-oriented Internet business models that can be successful for the long run.”
In fact, the firm's growth and diversification mirror that of New York City in the last 20 years--from the financial sector boom of the 1980s to growth in the early 1990s of the commercial, retail, education and healthcare markets and later of the dot-coms and the emergent technology companies.
"We gave this great party but nobody came, and part of the problem was that when the dot-coms started to lose their glamour, the public also changed its mind and decided to play it safe by using a broker," said Martin.
The survey showed that 22% of the 1,842 dot-coms launched in 1999 and backed by venture capital have gone bust without paying any money to investors.
Like most dot-coms, the pretend site doesn't generate any revenue.
Things have improved lately, but the shakeout continues, with 54 dot-coms failing during the first quarter of this year.
Making fun of dot-coms is like shooting fish in a barrel; even a confirmed idiot is bound to hit now and again.
E-commerce and dot-coms are inextricably linked together.
Hard though it may be to recall, not too long ago the nation--or at least its chattering class--was entranced by the exuberant antics of the dot-coms, those technophiliac start-up firms that promised to Change Everything.
The crash of the dot-coms gets the media ink, but some tech-based start-ups are surviving and thriving.
Venture capitalist (VC) financed businesses, often referred to as dot-coms, have provided new avenues for manufacturers and distributors to bring the product to market and make sales.
Think Warren Buffett: He never got involved with the dot-coms, and he came out better than everyone."