dotage

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dot·age

 (dō′tĭj)
n.
A deterioration of mental faculties associated with aging.

[Middle English, from doten, to dote.]

dotage

(ˈdəʊtɪdʒ)
n
1. feebleness of mind, esp as a result of old age
2. foolish infatuation
[C14: from dote + -age]

dot•age

(ˈdoʊ tɪdʒ)

n.
1. a decline of mental faculties, esp. as associated with old age; senility.
2. excessive or foolish affection.
[1300–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dotage - mental infirmity as a consequence of old age; sometimes shown by foolish infatuations
eld, geezerhood, old age, years, age - a late time of life; "old age is not for sissies"; "he's showing his years"; "age hasn't slowed him down at all"; "a beard white with eld"; "on the brink of geezerhood"

dotage

noun old age, senility, advanced years, decrepitude, second childhood, eld (archaic), elderliness, autumn or winter of your years, agedness He's spending his dotage in a riverside cottage.

dotage

noun
The condition of being senile:
Translations

dotage

[ˈdəʊtɪdʒ] Nchochez f
to be in one's dotagechochear, estar chocho

dotage

[ˈdəʊtɪdʒ] n (= old age) → vieux jours mpl
to be in one's dotage → être dans ses vieux jours

dotage

nSenilität f, → Altersschwäche f; to be in one’s dotagein seiner zweiten Kindheit sein, senil sein; he’s spending his dotage in the south of Franceer verbringt seinen Lebensabend in Südfrankreich

dotage

[ˈdəʊtɪdʒ] n to be in one's dotageessere rimbambito/a

do·tage

n. senilidad, chochera, chochez.
References in classic literature ?
The contemptuously respectful attitude of the younger men to the old man in his dotage was expressed in the highest degree by the behavior of Chichagov, who knew of the accusations that were being directed against Kutuzov.
The least miserable among them appear to be those who turn to dotage, and entirely lose their memories; these meet with more pity and assistance, because they want many bad qualities which abound in others.
Major Effingham, in declining the liberal offers of the British ministry, had subjected himself to the suspicion of having attained his dotage, by all those who throng the avenues to court patronage, even in the remotest corners of that vast empire; but, when he thus voluntarily stripped himself of his great personal wealth, the remainder of the community seemed instinctively to adopt the conclusion also that he had reached a second childhood.