dotcommer

dotcommer

(ˌdɒtˈkɒmə)
n
1. (Computer Science) a person who carries out business on the internet
2. (Professions) a person who carries out business on the internet
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Pura Vida Coffee is the brainchild of dotcommer John Sage and Vineyard pastor Chris Dearnley.
Other candidates: starter castle (10), a dotcommer's first house, and McMansion (6), a big new home in incredibly bad taste.
On the panel "Broadband Comes of Age" with Goodland, was Christian Schock of Astra Multimedia who, in keeping with the typical language of a dotcommer, explained simple concepts using complicated words like "experience" rather than "use," "engaging the user" instead of "making the customer happy", "quantify the fun value" instead of "being entertaining," "low transaction" for "low-cost" and "billing relationship" for "finding a customer." This just after Takeshi Natsuno of Japan's DoCoMo warned in his address that the industry should not approach consumers with technology jargon."
In the '90s, many women lost confidence that they could succeed in a field where the early dotcommers were male graduates of Stanford's historic class of '94 who founded companies with other men just like themselves.
"The buildings down here were full of dot-com people, and the streets were packed all day because the dotcommers didn't have nine-to-five hours,"Wine says.
In the 1990s, too many people were wary of buying online and too few had internet access for dotcommers to prosper.
Those mean old dotcommers were turning a joyously lawless Wild West town into, well, Singapore--no swearin', no spittin', no nuthin'!
It's a lovely idea but a little out of date - supporting a business by advertising and e-commerce is what dotcommers did a few years ago, and you don't see many of them around nowadays.
The era of baby-faced dotcommers has definitely passed, but someone forgot to tell these guys.
RealNetworks president Larry Jacobson agreed: "Companies today must counteract that reliance," he said, suggesting that was perhaps the biggest downfall of the early dotcommers. "When the traditional ad models aren't there to support your business, you have to look at what is available and what works," such as premium consumer services, i.e.
This has become a hangout for dotcommers and locals alike for dance classes and open dance evenings.
I do think you're going to get the shake out with the dotcommers that we've been talking about, but I think that's a healthy thing for the market and a healthy thing for the Internet which is not going anywhere.