dotty

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dot·ty

 (dŏt′ē)
adj. dot·ti·er, dot·ti·est
1.
a. Mentally unbalanced; crazy.
b. Amusingly eccentric or unconventional.
c. Ridiculous or absurd: a dotty scheme.
2. Having a feeble or unsteady gait; shaky.
3. Obsessively infatuated or enamored.

[Probably alteration of Scots dottle, silly, from Middle English doten, to dote.]

dot′ti·ly adv.
dot′ti·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dotty

(ˈdɒtɪ)
adj, -tier or -tiest
1. slang chiefly Brit feeble-minded; slightly crazy
2. slang (foll by about) Brit extremely fond (of)
3. marked with dots
[C19: from dot1: sense development of 1 from meaning of "unsteady on one's feet"]
ˈdottily adv
ˈdottiness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dot•ty1

(ˈdɒt i)

adj. -ti•er, -ti•est. Informal.
1. crazy or eccentric.
2. very enthusiastic or infatuated (usu. fol. by about or over).
[1805–15]
dot′ti•ly, adv.
dot′ti•ness, n.

dot•ty2

(ˈdɒt i)

adj. -ti•er, -ti•est.
marked with dots.
[1805–15]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.dotty - informal or slang terms for mentally irregulardotty - informal or slang terms for mentally irregular; "it used to drive my husband balmy"
insane - afflicted with or characteristic of mental derangement; "was declared insane"; "insane laughter"
2.dotty - intensely enthusiastic about or preoccupied with; "crazy about cars and racing"; "he is potty about her"
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
enthusiastic - having or showing great excitement and interest; "enthusiastic crowds filled the streets"; "an enthusiastic response"; "was enthusiastic about taking ballet lessons"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

dotty

adjective (Slang, chiefly Brit.) crazy, touched, peculiar, eccentric, batty (slang), off-the-wall (slang), potty (Brit. informal), oddball (informal), loopy (informal), crackpot (informal), out to lunch (informal), out there (slang), outré, doolally (slang), off your trolley (slang), up the pole (informal), wacko or whacko (slang) She was obviously going a bit dotty.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

dotty

adjective
Afflicted with or exhibiting irrationality and mental unsoundness:
Informal: bonkers, cracked, daffy, gaga, loony.
Chiefly British: crackers.
Idioms: around the bend, crazy as a loon, mad as a hatter, not all there, nutty as a fruitcake, off one's head, off one's rocker, of unsound mind, out of one's mind, sick in the head, stark raving mad.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

dotty

[ˈdɒtɪ] ADJ (dottier (compar) (dottiest (superl))) (Brit) [person] → chiflado; [idea, scheme] → estrafalario, disparatado
you must be dotty!¿estás loco o qué?
it's driving me dottyesto me trae loco
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

dotty

[ˈdɒti] adj (= daft) [person] → loufoque, farfelu(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

dotty

adj (+er) (Brit inf) → kauzig, schrullig; to be dotty about somebody/something (= like)nach jdm/etw verrückt sein
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

dotty

[ˈdɒtɪ] adj (Brit) (fam) (mad) → tocco/a, strambo/a
to be dotty about sth → andare pazzo/a per qc
he's dotty about her → ha completamente perso la testa per lei
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact Sean O'Brien in The Sunday Times identifies 'a strain of dottiness that seems to have been acquired for the poet's amusement'.
Clair Nicholson), driven to dottiness by the desertion of her husband.
(46) Foolishness, dullness of mind, dottiness, dittsiness, hyperactivity, all sorts of conditions listed in the latest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, and so forth, fail to meet these conditions, and thus leave those they plague in the unhappy condition of possessing impairments that may not, themselves, be moral failures, but may well be causes of legal liability.
Moments of menace provided an even better contrast set against the dottiness of Bea and Giles, Lizzie Winkler and Andy Williams.
She illuminates something similar in Fitzgerald's own character too--a half-feigned vagueness or dottiness mixed with a tough tenacity that not only made her steady stream of books possible, once she got going, but made them what they were." MICHAEL UPCHURCH
His early fiction presents various failings of the oldest generation: greed, irresponsibility, dottiness. Often parents have already died.
We don't think government bonds are in a 'bubble' - par values will be respected and the potential mark-to-market losses are not comparable with the end of - for example - dotcom dottiness or CDO craziness.
Never underestimate the dottiness of lunatic fringe dog-lovers, the weirdos who pay for doggie "weddings" with honeymoon hotels, for elaborate funerals complete with service.
We shall miss Pendleton's wholesome dottiness, her eye for a photo opportunity and, above all, her racing instincts when she hangs up her puncture repair kit after London 2012.
Peter Amory is a dastardly Sir Percival Glyde, a touch of dottiness is provided by Glyn Grain as the wheelchair-bound Frederick Fairlie and the younger members of the cast, Thomas Brownlee, Isla Carter and Lucy Cudden, also acquit themselves well.
Derek Granger, of the Financial Times, echoed the point saying: Harold Pinter''s play comes in the school of random dottiness deriving from Beckett and Ionesco ...
On one level, of course, as an outsider, one is tempted to follow Bowra's own prescription and delight in the comedy of it all, the dottiness of human behavior.