double dip


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Related to double dip: Double Dip Recession

double dip

n
(Economics) economics
a. a recession in which a brief recovery in output is followed by another fall, because demand remains low
b. (as modifier): a double-dip recession.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
double déduction
References in periodicals archive ?
There may have been no double dip but growth has definitely been sluggish, figures show
"When I look at developing nations and their energy consumption, such as China, the Middle East and Russia, which can be seen as leading indicators, they do not signal a double dip," Birol told Reuters in an interview.
More than two thirds (68 per cent) admit they fear a double dip recession with a quarter worried their business isn't flexible enough to cope, 22 per cent say they don't feel prepared and one in five just outright don't believe their business will survive.
"For people looking for a double dip, the durable goods report told you the third quarter is going to look pretty good for capital spending.
BDO Partner Peter Hemington said: "If Q4 does indeed turn out to be the start of a double dip, it certainly won t be a merry Christmas for UK businesses.
Zhu Hongren, who is also chief engineer with the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, also ruled out the likelihood of an economic "double dip" in the latter half of the year.
DOOMSAYERS predicting a "double dip" fall in house prices are wrong, experts are insisting.
In particular, equity markets appear to be increasingly worried that there will be a double-dip in global corporate profits led by a global double dip in the economy.
Global Banking News-7 July 2010-Credit Suisse says double dip recession unlikely(C)2010 ENPublishing - http://www.enpublishing.co.uk
Singapore tops the list of countries searching for "double dip" most often, followed by South Korea, Hong Kong and the US.
New research shows more than a quarter of businesses believe that they will become insolvent if the economy suffers from a double dip recession.