double negative


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Related to double negative: prime focus

double negative

n.
A construction that employs two negatives, especially to express a single negation.
Usage Note: It is a truism of traditional grammar that double negatives combine to form an affirmative. Readers coming across a sentence like He cannot do nothing will therefore interpret it as an affirmative statement meaning "He must do something" unless they are prompted to view it as dialect or nonstandard speech. Readers will also assign an affirmative meaning to constructions that yoke not with an adjective or adverb that begins with a negative prefix such as in- or un-, as in a not infrequent visitor or a not unjust decision. In these expressions the double negative conveys a weaker affirmative than would be conveyed by the positive adjective or adverb by itself. Thus a not infrequent visitor seems likely to visit less frequently than a frequent visitor. · "You ain't heard nothin' yet," said Al Jolson in 1927 in The Jazz Singer, the first talking motion picture. He meant, of course, "You haven't heard anything yet." Some sixty years later President Reagan taunted his political opponents by saying "You ain't seen nothin' yet." These famous examples of double negatives that reinforce (rather than nullify) a negative meaning show clearly that this construction is alive and well in spoken English. In fact, multiple negatives have been used to convey negative meaning in English since Old English times, and for most of this period, the double negative was wholly acceptable. Thus Chaucer in The Canterbury Tales could say of the Friar, "Ther nas no man nowher so vertuous," meaning "There was no man anywhere so virtuous," and Shakespeare could allow Viola in Twelfth Night to say of her heart, "Nor never none / Shall mistress of it be, save I alone," by which she meant that no one except herself would ever be mistress of her heart. But in spite of this noble history, grammarians since the Renaissance have objected to this form of negative reinforcement employing the double negative. In their eagerness to make English conform to formal logic, they conceived and promulgated the notion that two negatives destroy each other and make a positive. This view was taken up by English teachers and has since become enshrined as a convention of Standard English. Nonetheless, the reinforcing double negative remains an effective construction in writing dialogue or striking a folksy note. · The ban on using double negatives to convey emphasis does not apply when the second negative appears in a separate phrase or clause, as in I will not surrender, not today, not ever or He does not seek money, no more than he seeks fame. Note that commas must be used to separate the negative phrases in these examples. Thus the sentence He does not seek money no more than he seeks fame is unacceptable, whereas the equivalent sentence with any is perfectly acceptable and requires no comma: He does not seek money any more than he seeks fame. See Usage Notes at hardly, scarcely.

double negative

n
(Grammar) a syntactic construction, often considered ungrammatical in standard Modern English, in which two negatives are used where one is needed, as in I wouldn't never have believed it
Usage: There are two contexts where double negatives are used. An adjective with negative force is often used with a negative in order to express a nuance of meaning somewhere between the positive and the negative: he was a not infrequent visitor; it is a not uncommon sight. Two negatives are also found together where they reinforce each other rather than conflict: he never went back, not even to collect his belongings. These two uses of what is technically a double negative are acceptable. A third case, illustrated by I shouldn't wonder if it didn't rain today, has the force of a weak positive statement (I expect it to rain today) and is common in informal English

dou′ble neg′ative


n.
a syntactic construction in which two negative words are used in the same clause to express a single negation.
[1820–30]
usage: The double negative was standard in English through the time of Shakespeare. In Modern English it is universally considered nonstandard: They never paid me no money. He didn't have nothing to do with it. In educated speech or writing, any and anything would be substituted for no and nothing. Certain uses of double negation, to express an affirmative, are fully standard: We cannot sit here and do nothing (meaning “we must do something”). In the not unlikely event that the bill passes, prices will rise (meaning the event is likely). See also hardly.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.double negative - an affirmative constructed from two negatives; "A not unwelcome outcome"
affirmative - a reply of affirmation; "he answered in the affirmative"
2.double negative - a grammatically substandard but emphatic negative; "I don't never go"
negative - a reply of denial; "he answered in the negative"
Translations

double negative

n (Ling) → doppia negazione f
References in classic literature ?
'I seen' for 'I saw.' You use the double negative - "
"What's the double negative?" he demanded; then added humbly, "You see, I don't even understand your explanations."
"A double negative is - let me see - well, you say, 'never helped nobody.' 'Never' is a negative.
It is true, I had not yet learned that I must say "It is I"; but I no longer was guilty of a double negative in writing, though still prone to that error in excited speech.
The comment added, 'In Shakespeare's day, double negatives were considered emphatic, but today they are considered grammar mistakes.'
"However, in some languages, such Russian, a double negative remains negative.
The composite metamaterial is sensitive to the outer temperature, which makes the double negative frequency regions tunable.
Caption: Matt Golden, Double Negative, 2011, C-print on velvet paper, cherry frame, 19 1/8 x 17 3/8".
For example, reporting on Queensland Health experience the 'double negative effect' associated with poor FOI or RTI experiences and criticisms emerging from PSI information.
One known weakness with the method is a sentence that contains a double negative. While the writer might be trying to say something positive with one negative word negating the other ("I don't hate the feature"), the sentiment analysis will see this as something that's very negative.
Fay McConkey, 43, a visual effects production manager from Allesley, was part of the Double Negative team which worked on the film.
Using their code, the Interstellar team, comprising London-based visual effects company Double Negative and Caltech theoretical physicist Kip Thorne, found that when a camera is close up to a rapidly spinning black hole, peculiar surfaces in space, known as caustics, create more than a dozen images of individual stars and of the thin, bright plane of the galaxy in which the black hole lives.