double possessive


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double possessive

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dou′ble posses′sive


n.
a possessive construction consisting of a prepositional phrase with of containing a substantive in the possessive case, as of father's in She is a friend of father's. Also called double genitive.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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The "a dear friend of Manet's" construction is called a double possessive, which has two requirements: when the word after "of" is an animate object (at the time, Manet was animate); and the word before "of" refers to only a portion of the animate object's possessions.
Benetto Michael Imperioli Posey Benetto Ellen Burstyn Len Benetto Scott Cohen Young Posey Samantha Mathis Young Chick Vadim Imperioli Rose Alice Drummond Maria Emily Wickersham Executing a rare double possessive flagging the brand-name talent involved --"Oprah Winfrey Presents Mitch Albom's For One More Day"--this latest ABC movie blessed by daytime's queen should deliver the goods ratings-wise and buttress Albom's reputation as one of our foremost purveyors of cultural baby food.
Levy, who is marketing communications manager for the Water Environment Federation in Alexandria, Va., writes, "Is it incorrect to say |She is a friend of mine?' Isn't that a double possessive? The |of signifies possession, so technically it should be |She is a friend of me.' Has |friend of mine' become accepted based on euphony?"
The of and the apostrophe make for a double possessive, which is idiomatically proper.
"Two conditions must apply for a double possessive to occur: The word after 'of' must refer to an animate object (in this case, Donald Trump); and the word before 'of' must involve only a portion of the animate object's possessions."