double reed


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double reed

n.
1. A pair of joined reeds that vibrate together to produce sound in certain wind instruments, such as bassoons and oboes.
2. An instrument in which sound is produced by a pair of joined reeds.

dou′ble-reed′ adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.double reed - a woodwind that has a pair of joined reeds that vibrate together
bassoon - a double-reed instrument; the tenor of the oboe family
beating-reed instrument, reed instrument, reed - a musical instrument that sounds by means of a vibrating reed
double reed - a pair of joined reeds that vibrate together to produce the sound in some woodwinds
cor anglais, English horn - a double-reed woodwind instrument similar to an oboe but lower in pitch
cromorne, crumhorn, krummhorn - a Renaissance woodwind with a double reed and a curving tube (crooked horn)
hautbois, hautboy, oboe - a slender double-reed instrument; a woodwind with a conical bore and a double-reed mouthpiece
2.double reed - a pair of joined reeds that vibrate together to produce the sound in some woodwinds
double reed, double-reed instrument - a woodwind that has a pair of joined reeds that vibrate together
vibrating reed, reed - a vibrator consisting of a thin strip of stiff material that vibrates to produce a tone when air streams over it; "the clarinetist fitted a new reed onto his mouthpiece"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
dobbelt rørblad
Doppelrohrblatt
Dubbelriet
References in classic literature ?
In English it becomes hautboy, a wooden musical instrument of two-foot tone, I believe, played with a double reed, an oboe, in fact.
The musical instruments played at the programmed were namely: Nadaswarum, a double reed wind instrument from South India; flute, Carnatic Violin, a violin that carried one of the most exotic and mysterious sounds; western violin, saxophone, trumpet, keyboard, Mridagum, a percussion instrument from India of ancient origin; Thavil, a barrel shaped percussion instrument from Tamilnadu; Rhythm, Bass Guitar, and Head Guitar.
She was also involved with the Active Arts Celebration (Carbondale), Arts Education Festival (SIUC), the Dance Notation Bureau Inc., International Double Reed Society, Illinois Federal Music Club (treasurer), Sacred Dance Guild, Memorial Hospital Guild, International Conference Kinetography Laban (treasurer), Maga Museum (SIU), St.
A double reed, though, must be considered as complexity squared, as both pieces of cane, bound together, vibrate in interaction against each other.
A double reed, the short wood barrel, threaded acrylic insert and machined aluminum collar make it sing hen mallard.
The tongue must be free to articulate against the reed or plalate in single reed and double reed instruments.
The Sarasota Festival, the Fontana Music Festival, the International Clarinet Association, and the International Double Reed Society are among the places where Mark appeared as guest, composer-in-residence, or featured composer, with new works commissioned and performed for each occasion.
Sanchez was known for his musical talents as a boy, playing a dulzania, a Spanish double reed instrument related to the oboe, Guinness said.
org.uk TUESDAY Syrinx Performing on a wide array of double reed instruments ranging from shawms and dulcians to the oboe and bassoon.
It's a double reed in the chanter and they tend to split.
To conclude, as a student of the South Asian performance cultures, especially that of India and Nepal, and as someone who believes in guru-shishya parampara or teaching-learning heritage, I think that the plays discussed by Esslin and Bennett, including their works--The Theatre of the Absurd and Reassessing the Theatre of the Absurd respectively--make a "double reed flute," a critical term I borrow from Kapila Vatsyayan, a renowned Indian art and culture-critic.