double rhyme


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double rhyme

n.
A two-syllable feminine rhyme, as in regal/eagle or ended/blended.

fem′inine rhyme′



n.
a rhyme either of two syllables of which the second is unstressed (double rhyme), as in motion, notion, or of three syllables of which the second and third are unstressed (triple rhyme), as in fortunate, importunate.
[1865–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.double rhyme - a two-syllable rhyme; "`ended' and `blended' form a double rhyme"
rhyme, rime - correspondence in the sounds of two or more lines (especially final sounds)
References in periodicals archive ?
(50.) The examples are just a select few of the considerably larger group of interlocking poems that include not merely all three vowels endings and sukun, but also repetitions of the same double rhyme and vowel and the repetition as rhyme word of key words.
In each stanza, the double rhyme in the third line wobbles the tone toward amusement before adjusting back to seriousness again in the fourth, when the heavy single rhyme mutes the double rhyme buried in the middle of the stanza.
feminine rhymealso called double rhyme. In poetry, a rhyme involving two syllables (as in motion and ocean or willow and billow).
Three rhymes are recognized by purists as "true rhymes": masculine rhyme, in which the two words end with the same vowel-consonant combination (stand/land); feminine rhyme (sometimes called double rhyme), in which two syllables rhyme (profession/discretion); and trisyllabic rhyme, in which three syllables rhyme (patinate/latinate).
(as "Ove") Michaelsen, Word Ways, May 2001, revised in July 2008 In grammar school, just passing time, I wrote this hackneyed double rhyme. "This purple bird is dumb an' lazy, And his chirp'll drive one crazy."
Whatever the type, spoonerisms are pleasing to the ear because the ends of the words have the same sound thus retaining a double rhyme.