double-bind

Related to double-bind: double-blind

double-bind

Two contradictory responses from a person. Some schools hold that this is sometimes a root cause of schizophrenia.
References in periodicals archive ?
The results illustrate the potential importance of the acceptance of androgyny (the supposition that an individual can possess both components of the double-bind construct, as opposed only possessing one or the other).
Ellsworth (1997) and Levine-Rasky (2000) define such paradoxes as "double binds." Ellsworth describes the "double-bind" as "the power-inflected communication process" (p.
Previously, this double-bind has forced patients to look to the black market for cheaper, albeit substandard, drugs.
Gregory Bateson (1969/1972) introduced the concept of "double-bind." The double-bind theory focuses on communication dilemmas that arise when an individual receives two conflicting messages that negate each other.
A 'double-bind' is a situation in which we are presented with contradictory instructions, where an effective response to one injunction results in a failed response to the other.
It's a Christmassy conundrum that would have Stephen Hawkings virtually scratching his head, a Morton's fork of a double-bind and no mistake.
"Understanding this double-bind is fundamental to understanding how societal pressures might shape the visual depictions of male and female leaders online, whether political or otherwise," the authors wrote.
For the colonial subject, however, this double inscription is felt as an "insoluble double-bind" (10).
According to The Double-Bind Dilemma for Women in Leadership: Damned if You Do, Doomed if You Don't, a study released by Catalyst, a nonprofit organization working to advance opportunities for women and business, one of the key barriers to women's advancement in corporate leadership is gender stereotyping.
Again, when women are working in a career that is exploitive in nature, there isn't a strong need to use this double-bind to further disempower them.
If Humma believes that the "fragmented" nature of the text reflects Somers's general condition, I propose that we interpret the novel's "failure" more generally as a reflection of the Australian colonial psyche hopelessly split by the effects of the colonial double-bind of masculinity.
Subsequent to their expansions, there have been further enlargements on Russell's theme, such as those that are found in this book in chapters titled "The Liar," "The Predictions Paradox," "The Prisoner's Dilemma," "The Double-Bind," and in an afterword by Corey Anton.