doughty

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dough·ty

 (dou′tē)
adj. dough·ti·er, dough·ti·est
Marked by stouthearted courage; brave.

[Middle English, from Old English dohtig; see dheugh- in Indo-European roots.]

dough′ti·ly adv.
dough′ti·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

doughty

(ˈdaʊtɪ)
adj, -tier or -tiest
hardy; resolute
[Old English dohtig; related to Old High German toht worth, Middle Dutch duchtich strong, Greek tukhē luck]
ˈdoughtily adv
ˈdoughtiness n

Doughty

(ˈdaʊtɪ)
n
(Biography) Charles Montagu. 1843–1926, English writer and traveller; author of Travels in Arabia Deserta (1888)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dough•ty

(ˈdaʊ ti)

adj. -ti•er, -ti•est.
courageous and resolute; valiant.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English dohtig worthy <*doht worth (c. Old High German toht)]
dough′ti•ly, adv.
dough′ti•ness, n.

Dough•ty

(ˈdaʊ ti)

n.
Charles Montagu, 1843–1926, English traveler and writer.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

doughty

adjective (Old-fashioned) intrepid, brave, daring, bold, hardy, heroic, courageous, gritty, fearless, resolute, gallant, valiant, redoubtable, dauntless, valorous, stouthearted doughty campaigns for the underprivileged
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

doughty

adjective
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

doughty

[ˈdaʊtɪ] ADJ (doughtier (compar) (doughtiest (superl))) [person] → valiente, esforzado; [deed] → hazañoso
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

doughty

adj (liter)kühn, tapfer
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

doughty

[ˈdaʊtɪ] adj (-tier (comp) (-tiest (superl))) (old) → valoroso/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Hordes of the doughtiest fighting-men of the First Born poured from the audience to check our progress.
Few of Rich Cummins' rivals are all that stoutly bred, which may seem surprising at first, but in reality those with the doughtiest pedigrees are rarely handicapping by this stage.
As the world's doughtiest exporter at 10.8 percent of the global total, they singled out China as a country with "special responsibility".
But it was also because she has been their doughtiest champion inside cabinet in the tug-of-war over how close Britain should remain to the European Union after Brexit.
? Pinley produced their doughtiest Midlands Two display of the season to tame leaders Banbury 7-6.
In a novel crammed with enough memorable point-of-view characters to please the doughtiest Dickensian realist, John's wife's is the only narrative consciousness we have no access to, whether through free indirect discourse or otherwise.
BY THE age of 89, even the doughtiest of men slow down.
It is one of the many ironies which litter the affair that Dreyfus' arch-enemy, Esterhazy, and his doughtiest champion, Zola, both sought sanctuary in England from the storms that the affair aroused.