dour

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dour

 (do͝or, dour)
adj. dour·er, dour·est
1. Marked by sternness or harshness; forbidding: a dour, self-sacrificing life.
2. Silently ill-humored; gloomy: the proverbially dour New England Puritan.
3. Sternly obstinate; unyielding: a dour determination.

[Middle English, possibly from Middle Irish dúr, probably from Latin dūrus, hard; see deru- in Indo-European roots.]

dour′ly adv.
dour′ness n.
Usage Note: The word dour, which is etymologically related to duress and endure, traditionally rhymes with tour. The pronunciation that rhymes with sour is a standard variant that has been in use for more than a century. In our 1996 survey, 65 percent of the Usage Panel preferred the traditional pronunciation, and 33 percent preferred the variant. In our 2011 survey, opinion was almost evenly split, with 52 percent preferring the traditional pronunciation and 48 percent preferring the variant. These results suggest that the variant could overtake the traditional pronunciation in preference.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dour

(dʊə; ˈdaʊə)
adj
1. sullen
2. hard or obstinate
[C14: probably from Latin dūrus hard]
ˈdourly adv
ˈdourness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dour

(dʊər, daʊər, ˈdaʊ ər)

adj.
1. sullen; gloomy.
2. severe; stern.
3. Scot. (of land) barren; rocky.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin dūrus hard, severe]
dour′ly, adv.
dour′ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.dour - stubbornly unyieldingdour - stubbornly unyielding; "dogged persistence"; "dour determination"; "the most vocal and pertinacious of all the critics"; "a mind not gifted to discover truth but tenacious to hold it"- T.S.Eliot; "men tenacious of opinion"
obstinate, stubborn, unregenerate - tenaciously unwilling or marked by tenacious unwillingness to yield
2.dour - harshly uninviting or formidable in manner or appearance; "a dour, self-sacrificing life"; "a forbidding scowl"; "a grim man loving duty more than humanity"; "undoubtedly the grimmest part of him was his iron claw"- J.M.Barrie
unpleasant - disagreeable to the senses, to the mind, or feelings ; "an unpleasant personality"; "unpleasant repercussions"; "unpleasant odors"
3.dour - showing a brooding ill humor; "a dark scowl"; "the proverbially dour New England Puritan"; "a glum, hopeless shrug"; "he sat in moody silence"; "a morose and unsociable manner"; "a saturnine, almost misanthropic young genius"- Bruce Bliven; "a sour temper"; "a sullen crowd"
ill-natured - having an irritable and unpleasant disposition
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

dour

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

dour

adjective
1. Cold and forbidding:
2. Broodingly and sullenly unhappy:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

dour

[ˈdʊəʳ] ADJ (= grim) → adusto, arisco
a dour Scotun escocés adusto or arisco
a dour struggleuna batalla muy reñida
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

dour

[ˈdaʊər ˈdʊər] adj [person] → froid(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

dour

adj (= silent, unfriendly)verdrießlich; strugglehart, hartnäckig
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

dour

[ˈdʊəʳ] adj (grim) → arcigno/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
He looked abroad on the general dourness of gray earth and gray air and gray sky, and said a storm was brewing.
Was I to be seen at last with the veil of dourness lifted?
His celebration of the unacknowledged variousness and quality of northern writing past and present almost suggests "Against Dourness" as an alternative title.
If he's going to continue with this dourness and this moaning, then people will turn around and say this attitude is not getting us to the top so we need to change it.
His first novel in 10 years is a compassionate, soulful read that avoids dourness by being surprisingly funny.
The Senate embraced him, and he was hailed as a breath of fresh air after the dourness, absenteeism and miserliness of his great-uncle, Emperor Tiberius.
He has swimming, Kumon math (which he hates, as all kids do, but it seems a rite of passage for young students so to lighten his dourness, we thought of a 'Come on, Kumon' chant), drums, basketball practice and games for the youngest team in the league (The Wildcats, for which he plays forward or center), Sunday choir for the 9 a.m.
Robinson's wanderings are part of an investigation into the problem of London, but they also constitute a search for an antidote to the misery and dourness of the city--an antidote he finds, if briefly, in the multi-cultural communities of places such as Brixton.
Despite their dourness, they evince nothing but pride and happiness at being Jews.