dovecote

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dove·cote

 (dŭv′kōt′, -kŏt′) also dove·cot (-kŏt′)
n.
A compartmental structure, often raised on a pole, for housing domesticated pigeons.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dovecote

(ˈdʌvˌkəʊt) or

dovecot

n
(Architecture) a structure for housing pigeons, often raised on a pole or set on a wall, containing compartments for the birds to roost and lay eggs
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dove•cote

(ˈdʌvˌkoʊt)

also dove•cot

(-kɒt)

n.
a structure, usu. at a height above the ground, for housing domestic pigeons.
[1375–1425]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dovecote - a birdhouse for pigeonsdovecote - a birdhouse for pigeons    
birdhouse - a shelter for birds
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

dovecote

[ˈdʌvkɒt] Npalomar m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

dovecote

[ˈdʌvkəʊt] dovecot [ˈdʌvkɒt] npigeonnier m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

dovecote

[ˈdʌvˌkəʊt] ncolombaia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Birds do not sing in caves, nor do doves cherish their innocence in dovecots.
It was an old, dilapidated, mouldering dovecot. The husband's portrait was used as a weather-cock, which was connected in some way or other with the doors, and so they opened and shut of their own accord, whenever the stern old husband turned round.
"He has gone to make his report, and to say that all the pigeons are at this moment in the dovecot"
Crisp was summoned from Buxton, and abruptly carried off her darling boy; but the idea, even, of such an eagle in the Chiswick dovecot caused a great flutter in the breast of Miss Pinkerton, who would have sent away Miss Sharp but that she was bound to her under a forfeit, and who never could thoroughly believe the young lady's protestations that she had never exchanged a single word with Mr.