dowlas


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dowlas

(ˈdaʊləs)
n
a coarse plain fabric
References in classic literature ?
"What do you say to that, eh, Dowlas?" said the landlord, turning to the farrier, who was swelling with impatience for his cue.
Dowlas was the negative spirit in the company, and was proud of his position.
"Why, Dowlas, that's easy betting, that is," said Ben Winthrop.
"If Master Dowlas wants to know the truth on it," said Mr.
"Ah, but who's to watch you, Dowlas, and see you do it?
"Aye, but there's this in it, Dowlas," said the landlord, speaking in a tone of much candour and tolerance.
An area forever associated with a visit from King Edward VIII in November 1936, who was appalled by the loss of the Dowlas Top steel works and the livelihoods of the work force.
Developers such as Persimmon Homes, St Modwen and Dowlas (UK) are already on board together with Weston College and North Somerset Council to help promote the commercial, investment and business opportunities that are on offer at J21EA.
These linen products included "[d]rillings, osnaburghs, ticklenburghs, dowlas, canvas, brown rolls, bagging, and all other lines the first cost of which at the place of exportation does not exceed 35 cents per yard." See ALEXANDER HAMILTON, REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY OF THE UNITED STATES ON THE SUBJECT OF MANUFACTURES, PRESENTED TO THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES ON DEC.
Dowlas takes up "the thread of the discourse" (96); and late in the novel we see the "one main thread of painful experience in Nancy's married life" (215).
So as to look more kingly, Falstaff ripped off his filthy dowlas, perched a metal bowl upside down on his head, and preached with regal manliness: a king of misrule fabricating royal authority.
in Balbriggan in County Dublin wove, among others, linen and union sheetings, dowlas, towellings, drills, canvas, shirtings, frontings, linen and union ticks.