down the wind


Related to down the wind: wind up

wind 1

 (wĭnd)
n.
1.
a. Moving air, especially a natural and perceptible movement of air parallel to or along the ground.
b. A movement of air generated artificially, as by bellows or a fan.
2.
a. The direction from which a movement of air comes: The wind is north-northwest.
b. A movement of air coming from one of the four cardinal points of the compass: the four winds.
3. Moving air carrying sound, an odor, or a scent.
4.
a. Breath, especially normal or adequate breathing; respiration: had the wind knocked out of them.
b. Gas produced in the stomach or intestines during digestion; flatulence.
5. often winds Music
a. The brass and woodwinds sections of a band or orchestra.
b. Wind instruments or their players considered as a group.
c. Woodwinds.
6.
a. Something that disrupts or destroys: the winds of war.
b. A tendency; a trend: the winds of change.
7. Information, especially of something concealed; intimation: Trouble will ensue if wind of this scandal gets out.
8.
a. Speech or writing empty of meaning; verbiage: His remarks on the subject are nothing but wind.
b. Vain self-importance; pomposity: an expert who was full of wind even before becoming famous.
tr.v. wind·ed, wind·ing, winds
1. To expose to free movement of air; ventilate or dry.
2.
a. To detect the smell of; catch a scent of.
b. To pursue by following a scent.
3. To cause to be out of or short of breath.
4. To afford a recovery of breath: stopped to wind and water the horses.
Idioms:
before the wind Nautical
In the same direction the wind is blowing.
close to/near the wind
1. Nautical As close as possible to the direction the wind is blowing from.
2. Close to danger.
down the wind
Nautical Downwind.
in the wind
Likely to occur; in the offing: Big changes are in the wind.
into the wind
Nautical In the same or nearly the same direction as the wind is blowing from.
off the wind Nautical
In a direction that is not as close as possible to the direction the wind is blowing from.
on the wind Nautical
Close to the wind.
take the wind out of (one's) sails
To rob of an advantage; deflate.
under the wind
1. Nautical To the leeward.
2. In a location protected from the wind.
up the wind Nautical
Upwind.

[Middle English, from Old English; see wē- in Indo-European roots.]

wind 2

 (wīnd)
v. wound (wound), wind·ing, winds
v.tr.
1. To wrap (something) around a center or another object once or repeatedly: wind string around a spool.
2. To wrap or encircle (an object) in a series of coils; entwine: wound her injured leg with a bandage; wound the waist of the gown with lace and ribbons.
3.
a. To go along (a curving or twisting course): wind a path through the mountains.
b. To proceed on (one's way) with a curving or twisting course.
4. To introduce in a disguised or devious manner; insinuate: He wound a plea for money into his letter.
5. To turn (a crank, for example) in a series of circular motions.
6.
a. To coil the spring of (a mechanism) by turning a stem or cord, for example: wind a watch.
b. To coil (thread, for example), as onto a spool or into a ball.
c. To remove or unwind (thread, for example), as from a spool: wound the line off the reel.
7. To lift or haul by means of a windlass or winch: Wind the pail to the top of the well.
v.intr.
1. To move in or have a curving or twisting course: a river winding through a valley.
2.
a. To move in or have a spiral or circular course: a column of smoke winding into the sky.
b. To be coiled or spiraled: The vine wound about the trellis.
3. To be twisted or whorled into curved forms.
4. To proceed misleadingly or insidiously in discourse or conduct.
5. To become wound: a clock that winds with difficulty.
n.
1. The act of winding.
2. A single turn, twist, or curve.
Phrasal Verbs:
wind down
1. To diminish or cause to diminish gradually in energy, intensity, or scope: The party wound down as guests began to leave.
2. To relax; unwind.
wind up
1. To come or bring to a finish; end: when the meeting wound up; wind up a project.
2. To put in order; settle: wound up her affairs before leaving the country.
3. To arrive in a place or situation after or because of a course of action: took a long walk and wound up at the edge of town; overspent and wound up in debt.
4. Baseball To swing back the arm and raise the foot in preparation for pitching the ball.

[Middle English winden, from Old English windan.]

wind 3

 (wīnd, wĭnd)
tr.v. wind·ed (wīn′dĭd, wĭn′-) or wound (wound), wind·ing, winds Music
1. To blow (a wind instrument).
2. To sound by blowing.

[From wind.]

wind′er n.
References in classic literature ?
The painter was so startled that he gave utterance to a very oath of pity, and I felt a sinking myself, for in these hasty words my little boy was gone, indeed; all my bright dreams of Timothy, all my efforts to shelter him from Mary's scorn, went whistling down the wind.
Tom had struggled with his pride a few days, and tried to "whistle her down the wind," but failed.
Pluck up your courage, and we'll let Townleys and MacNairs whistle their mouldy feuds down the wind while we sail southward in The Fair Lady.
Then they darted around her bow and began the row down her port side, and we tacked about, crossed her bow, and went plunging down the wind hot after them.
The snake was still bent on revenge, wriggling and twisting itself backwards till it struck the bird that held it, on the neck and breast; whereon the bird being in pain, let it fall, dropping it into the middle of the host, and then flew down the wind with a sharp cry.
The heat was tempered by a light western breeze; the voices of laborers at work in a field near reached the house cheerfully; the clock-bell of the village church as it struck the quarters floated down the wind with a clearer ring, a louder melody than usual.
The ancient story of failure, ill-luck, undeserved disaster, went down the wind, disconnected syllables flying past Ralph's ears with a queer alternation of loudness and faintness as if, at certain moments, the man's memory of his wrongs revived and then flagged, dying down at last into a grumble of resignation, which seemed to represent a final lapse into the accustomed despair.
De Beranger has wrought innumerable things, pungent and spirit-stirring, but in general they have been too imponderous to stamp themselves deeply into the public attention, and thus, as so many feathers of fancy, have been blown aloft only to be whistled down the wind.
Neither must you "forsake the ship in a tempest, because you cannot rule and keep down the winds.
Starring in Whistle Down The Wind are, from left, Dominic Allison as Poor Baby, Hollie Aires as Swallow and Scarlett Behl as Brat.
Whistle Down The Wind Beaufort Theatre, Ebbw Vale, 7pm Tickets: PS8.
The planned, curved seating area is a good idea and will, hopefully, slow down the wind but, it seems to me, is more than likely to spray, with cold water, anyone sitting or walking nearby, if a fountain is placed in the centre