down-at-heel


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Related to down-at-heel: dug in their heels, dig in his heels

down-at-heel

(doun′ət-hēl′) or down-at-the-heel (-ət-thə-)
adj.
1. Worn out from long use or neglect; dilapidated.
2. Shabbily dressed because of poverty; seedy.

down-at-heel

adj
shabby and run down

down′-at-heel(s)′

or down′-at-the-heel(s)′,



adj.
of a shabby, run-down appearance; seedy.
[1695–1705]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

down-at-heel

adjective poor, impoverished, shabby, badly off, seedy, on the rocks, hard up (informal), penniless, poverty-stricken, in need, in want, impecunious, on the breadline, penurious, on your uppers, without two pennies to rub together (informal), on your beam-ends, out at elbows a down-at-heel waitress in a greasy diner

down-at-heel

or down-at-the-heel
adjective
Showing signs of wear and tear or neglect:
Informal: tacky.
Slang: ratty.
Idioms: all the worse for wear, gone to pot, past cure.
Translations

down-at-heel

[ˈdaʊnətˈhiːl] ADJ [person, appearance] → desastrado; [bar, café] → de mala muerte; [shoes] → gastado

down-at-heel

[ˌdaʊnətˈhiːl] adjscalcagnato/a; (fig) → trasandato/a

down1

(daun) adverb
1. towards or in a low or lower position, level or state. He climbed down to the bottom of the ladder.
2. on or to the ground. The little boy fell down and cut his knee.
3. from earlier to later times. The recipe has been handed down in our family for years.
4. from a greater to a smaller size, amount etc. Prices have been going down steadily.
5. towards or in a place thought of as being lower, especially southward or away from a centre. We went down from Glasgow to Bristol.
preposition
1. in a lower position on. Their house is halfway down the hill.
2. to a lower position on, by, through or along. Water poured down the drain.
3. along. The teacher's gaze travelled slowly down the line of children.
verb
to finish (a drink) very quickly, especially in one gulp. He downed a pint of beer.
ˈdownward adjective
leading, moving etc down. a downward curve.
ˈdownward(s) adverb
towards a lower position or state. The path led downward (s) towards the sea.
down-and-ˈout noun, adjective
(a person) having no money and no means of earning a living. a hostel for down-and-outs.
ˌdown-at-ˈheel adjective
shabby, untidy and not well looked after or well-dressed.
ˈdowncast adjective
(of a person) depressed; in low spirits. a downcast expression.
ˈdownfall noun
a disastrous fall, especially a final failure or ruin. the downfall of our hopes.
ˌdownˈgrade verb
to reduce to a lower level, especially of importance. His job was downgraded.
ˌdownˈhearted adjective
depressed and in low spirits, especially lacking the inclination to carry on with something. Don't be downhearted! – we may yet win.
ˌdownˈhill adverb
1. down a slope. The road goes downhill all the way from our house to yours.
2. towards a worse and worse state. We expected him to die, I suppose, because he's been going steadily downhill for months.
downˈhill racing noun
racing downhill on skis.
downˈhill skiing noun
ˌdown-in-the-ˈmouth adjective
miserable; in low spirits.
down payment
a payment in cash, especially to begin the purchase of something for which further payments will be made over a period of time.
ˈdownpour noun
a very heavy fall of rain.
ˈdownright adverb
plainly; there's no other word for it. I think he was downright rude!
adjective
He is a downright nuisance!
ˈdownstairs adjective
, ˌdownˈstairsadverb on or towards a lower floor. He walked downstairs; I left my book downstairs; a downstairs flat.
ˌdownˈstream adverb
further along a river towards the sea. We found/rowed the boat downstream.
ˌdown-to-ˈearth adjective
practical and not concerned with theories, ideals etc. She is a sensible, down-to-earth person.
ˈdowntown adjective
(American) the part (of a city) containing the main centres for business and shopping. downtown Manhattan.
ˌdownˈtown adverb
(also down town) in or towards this area. to go downtown; I was down town yesterday.
ˈdown-trodden adjective
badly treated; treated without respect. a down-trodden wife.
be/go down with
to be or become ill with. The children all went down with measles.
down on one's luck
having bad luck.
down tools
to stop working. When the man was sacked his fellow workers downed tools and walked out.
down with
get rid of. Down with the dictator!
get down to
to begin working seriously at or on. I must get down to some letters!
suit (someone) down to the ground
to suit perfectly. That arrangement will suit me down to the ground.
References in classic literature ?
Eliza returns with a pair of large down-at-heel slippers.
Wherever he went, this foredoomed Tip appeared to take the prison walls with him, and to set them up in such trade or calling; and to prowl about within their narrow limits in the old slip-shod, purposeless, down-at-heel way; until the real immovable Marshalsea walls asserted their fascination over him, and brought him back.
Brooklynn Prince gives a wonderfully uninhibited performance as a six-year-old left to run riot around her down-at-heel motel home during the summer holidays.
Gritty and stark, with a skilful evocation of the down-at-heel, bleak seaside town.
And her transformation from a down-at-heel woman who's been dealt a cruel hand in life, into a manipulative, ambitious, ruthless and remorseless killer.
Set in the late 1950s, Young Hyacinth follows the heroine as she shares a cramped cottage with her down-at-heel family and is forced to work as a maid for her father's wartime RAF squadron leader.
At this show, more than seventy of Khakhar's paintings, ceramics, and works on paper will present honest appraisals of self and society: Portraits of down-at-heel tradesmen from the '70s will jostle with the artist's uncompromising representations of sexuality in a time and place where it was deemed taboo, while late self-portraits will document Khakhar's battle with cancer, which ended with his death in 2003.
In 1959, following spells at Carlisle and Huddersfield, Shankly took over at Anfield, turning Liverpool from a down-at-heel Second Division club into Britain's most successful club.
It certainly shouldn't be Eyesore Central, a down-at-heel and thoroughly miserable and depressing stretch of road.
Above, a down-at-heel Church Walk, Gateshead, 1920s; below, The Sage music centre stands in its place today, |from the book Gateshead Then and Now In Colour by Rob Kirkup, published by The History Press
Our man is a down-at-heel psychic who's become a kind of paranormal messenger service for ghosts wanting to commune with their loved ones.
The millions saved by doing that could be spent on our down-at-heel schools and our children's future.