down-at-the-heel


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down-at-heel

(doun′ət-hēl′) or down-at-the-heel (-ət-thə-)
adj.
1. Worn out from long use or neglect; dilapidated.
2. Shabbily dressed because of poverty; seedy.
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down-at-heel

or down-at-the-heel
adjective
Showing signs of wear and tear or neglect:
Informal: tacky.
Slang: ratty.
Idioms: all the worse for wear, gone to pot, past cure.
References in classic literature ?
Zeena came into the room with her dragging down-at-the-heel step, and quietly took her accustomed seat between them.
This is Blue Book #2, one of thirty-six untitled images in "Blue Book," 2009, Dayanita Singh's series of photographs of industrial sites and deserted, down-at-the-heel interiors swaddled in shades of .
The once down-at-the-heel range has been given a new lease of life - not least with the arrival of the Colt supermini.
But yes, there is an argument for Bradley, and here it is: While Bradley claims to represent a "new politics," the truth is, he sounds more like an old-fashioned Democrat, concerned about those down-at-the-heel constituencies the New Dems abandoned years ago.
At least two pairs of well-fitting, low-heeled work shoes; not worn, misshapen, down-at-the-heel old street or dress footwear.
In a sense we got the Q-1 by throwing parts away," says Fremont president Paul Rothschild, who with associate Donald Smith and Rona Rothschild (married to Paul) bought Fremont four and a half years ago as a profitable but down-at-the-heel maker of toys, and auto and drainage parts.
Downtown was gilded, bustling, and dignified; Westside was down-at-the-heel.
Next door, Riverside Drive, consisting at the moment of slightly down-at-the-heel houses, is ripe for sensitive redevelopment.
A down-at-the-heels advertising copywriter when he hit on the idea, he originally meant it as a joke.
What was around in those days, before Times Square became a haven for tourists toting shopping bags from the M&M's store, was a down-at-the-heels neighborhood of working dancers, actors, singers and musicians.
According to this logic, the place would thus be safe for its down-at-the-heels inhabitants to continue living in large lofts without having to pay too much.
Every day we read in the newspaper about the woes and future of the down-at-the-heels section of our main street known as Mid-Market.