downside

(redirected from downsides)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Financial.

down·side

 (doun′sīd′)
n.
1. The lower side or portion.
2. A disadvantageous aspect: an option with a downside as well as benefits.
3. A downward tendency, as in the price of a stock.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

downside

(ˈdaʊnˌsaɪd)
n
the disadvantageous aspect of a situation: the downside of twentieth-century living.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

down•side

(ˈdaʊnˌsaɪd)

n.
1. the lower or underneath side.
2. a downward trend, esp. in stock prices.
3. a discouraging or negative aspect.
[1675–85]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.downside - a negative aspect of something that is generally positive; "there is a downside even to motherhood"
side - an aspect of something (as contrasted with some other implied aspect); "he was on the heavy side"; "he is on the purchasing side of the business"; "it brought out his better side"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

downside

noun drawback, disadvantage, snag, problem, trouble, minus (informal), flip side, other side of the coin (informal), bad or weak point There is a downside to this.
benefit, plus (informal), advantage, good or strong point
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

downside

[ˈdaʊnsaɪd] N (fig) → pega f, desventaja f, lo malo (of de)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

downside

[ˈdaʊnsaɪd] n (= disadvantage) → inconvénient m
the downside of sth → l'inconvénient de qch
there is a downside to sth [+ success, positive feature] → il y a un inconvénient à qch
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The Scottish Government believe the expansion could create 16,000 jobs here - but there could be downsides too.
Military might is not the only way to fight a war, but there are downsides to alternative methods to armed conventional conflict as well.
The 35-year-old actor said it was one of the downsides of filming the hit series in Wales.
The downsides are much the same as discussed in the other questions, including increased chemical and operating costs along with deposit and paper quality issues.
It was only many years later that we realized those technologies have downsides. Here we are once again embracing a technology, moving ahead full speed with no knowledge of the downside.
Are there some downsides to competition, especially for the young dancer?
Asked what he thought the downsides of EU membership are, he replied: "I don't see any downside to Brexit."