downsized


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down·size

 (doun′sīz′)
v. down·sized, down·siz·ing, down·siz·es
v.tr.
1. To reduce in number or size: a corporation that downsized its personnel in response to a poor economy.
2. To dismiss or lay off from work: workers who were downsized during the recession.
3. To make in a smaller size: cars that were downsized during an era of high gasoline prices.
4. To simplify (one's life, for instance), as by reducing the number of one's possessions.
v.intr.
1. To become smaller in size by reductions in personnel or assets: Corporations continued to downsize after the economy recovered.
2. To live in a simpler way, especially by moving into a smaller residence.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

downsized

(ˈdaʊnsaɪz)
adj
1. (Commerce) employing fewer people
2. (Economics) employing fewer people
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, the system is equipped with a 42 volt 1.3 kW cabin air heater that helps to compensate for the low heat rejection of a high-efficiency, downsized diesel engine under warm-up conditions from a cold start.
But her idea took on more urgency early in 1995, after she had been downsized twice in three years.
For example, although a downsized management may be able to handle a firm's routine operations, it may find that it no longer has the expertise needed to handle more demanding tasks, such as the introduction of new products.
These must be either downsized or redesigned for improved efficiency before being renegotiated with Hydro.
In light of all the other factors now hampering our success--lower hiring levels, increased global competition, retrenched benefits packages and flattening salaries--perhaps the most damaging blow is that blacks are being downsized at a higher rate than any other group.
Ted Ball, president of Health Concepts Consultants of Toronto, predicts that Ontario's hospital system will be massively downsized over the next two years.
The deeply eco-minded (and of course Norwegian) scientists who come up with the concept hope that 'going small' will save humanity -- but in fact, in the real world, those who agree to be downsized couldn't care less about the planet; all they care about is that, in an economy geared to the normal-sized, buying only small portions allows you to live like a king.
One such study conducted by the authors in reference [5], which downsized a diesel engine from 13L to 9L, showed that downsizing of the diesel engine was effective in reducing friction at all engine speeds.
This adds to the 15 per cent of those aged 55 plus in the north west who have already downsized, according to the study, suggesting that in total more than half of those in the north west are potentially making or have taken the step.
Auto Business News-January 19, 2016--Mahindra to launch downsized version of 2.2-litre mHawk diesel engine in Scorpio and XUV500
Faisal Khan of storage house StorALL, said: "We have many such customers - families who have moved from villas in Jumeirah to smaller apartments in Motor City, a family that has shifted from a Mirdif villa to an Al Barsha apartment and a couple of others who have downsized from the Arabian Ranches to the Greens and Al Barsha."
It has been estimated that roughly 2,000 employees were downsized in American corporations each business day throughout the 1990s (De Meuse and Marks, 2003).