downswing

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down·swing

 (doun′swĭng′)
n.
1. A swing downward, as of a golf club.
2. A decline, as of a business.

downswing

(ˈdaʊnˌswɪŋ)
n
1. (Statistics) a statistical downward trend in business activity, the death rate, etc
2. (Golf) golf the downward movement or line of a club when striking the ball

down•swing

(ˈdaʊnˌswɪŋ)

n.
1. a downward swing, as of a golf club.
2. a downward trend, as of business.
[1895–1900]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.downswing - a swing downward of a golf club
golf shot, golf stroke, swing - the act of swinging a golf club at a golf ball and (usually) hitting it
2.downswing - a worsening of business or economic activity; "the market took a downturn"
worsening - changing something with the result that it becomes worse
downspin - a swift and dangerous downturn

downswing

noun
A usually swift downward trend, as in prices:
Translations

downswing

[ˈdaʊnswɪŋ] N (fig) → recesión f, caída f

downswing

[ˈdaʊnswɪŋ] n (= slump) → baisse f soudaine

downswing

[ˈdaʊnˌswɪŋ] downturn [ˈdaʊnˌtɜːn] n (Statistics) → calo
References in periodicals archive ?
The various "soft" data measures remain at historically high levels, but downswings such as today's, aggravate the market's recession fears.
In this brutal world where power rests exclusively with the player, in which upswings in form equate to huge pay rises and downswings are ignored as nothing more that a temporary dip in confidence, Ward may be right about Sterling (below).
Figures 12 and 13 compare the mean lengths of upswings and downswings in the terms of trade across the advanced economies in the sample.
New Zealand has experienced relatively large upswings and downswings, although these have been smaller than those in Australia, Norway and Japan (figures 14 and 15).
For instance, Neftci (1984) found the US unemployment rate increases more sharply during downswings than it declines during upswings.
The BMI of white men and women experienced upsurges after the two World Wars and downswings during the Great Depression and again after 1970.
Some citizens enjoy fantastic prosperity; many more face realities of fewer stable jobs, cutbacks in benefits such as health insurance, violent upswings and downswings in personal income, and the erosion of traditional safety nets such as unemployment assistance and Social Security.
The most common cause of a slice (a shot that curves the ball from left to right, for a right handed golf) is caused by improper sequencing in the transition from backswing to downswing. Clark said many amateurs start their downswings with their hands, resulting in a "sort of casting motion.
The second intriguing piece of evidence is the strong share price advance of Paragon, a specialist in buy-to-let loans and long regarded by investors as too vulnerable to property market downswings.
Between 1979 and 1988, the instruments recorded strong upswings and downswings in average global temperature, each lasting several months, but showed no general warming trend, the researchers report in the March 30 SCIENCE.
We argue that the relationship between specific innovative strategies and their employment outcomes, taking into account changes in demand and wages, are radically different in upswings, when new products may open up new markets and offer new jobs, and in downswings, when new processes may come to dominate technological change, leading to restructuring and job losses.
Special reference is given to whether Australia has been going through long wave upswing or downswing over recent decades, and whether suitable social structures of accumulation are currently in place to propel sustainable growth in the long-term.