doxography


Also found in: Wikipedia.

doxography

the collection and compiling of extracts from ancient Greek philosophers, to which editorial comments are added. — doxographer, n. — doxographic, adj.
See also: Collections and Collecting
the compiling of extracts from ancient Greek philosophers, with editorial commentary. — doxographer, n.doxographical, adj.
See also: Philosophy
References in periodicals archive ?
Adam Smith's theory of absolute advantage and the use of doxography in the history of economics, Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 5(2): 54-80.
Key words: philosophy, knowledge, logos, reception, doxography, flux
1009) where Aetius' doxography reaches the question of how the Stoics think we acquire the concept of god:
Characters inspire story-telling, vignette, doxography.
Considerations of space do not allow me to offer an inclusive presentation of the relevant doxography here.
40) And another doxography, that of Hippolytus (Philosophumenon 2.
At first blush, this seems to read as a reductive thumbnail doxography, stating claims in blunt fashion without the arguments and contexts that give them significance.
By doxography he means the system used by weary professors when they convert their ancient lecture notes into books for students.
37) So generally accepted is this view that doxography would be pointless.
Mueller, `Heterodoxy and Doxography in Hippolytus' "Refutation of All Heresies"', ANRW II.
Doxography created a new intellectual space: a space of accumulation and hoarding of the doxai (opinions) of philosophers, where the coherence of systems and texts was deconstructed into a group of partial and fragmentary statements that could be compared, criticized, and regrouped around a single question.