drabble

(redirected from drabbles)

drab·ble

 (drăb′əl)
tr. & intr.v. drab·bled, drab·bling, drab·bles
To make or become wet and soiled by dragging; draggle.

[Middle English drabelen.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

drabble

(ˈdræbəl)
vb
to make or become wet or dirty
[C14: from Low German drabbelen to paddle in mud; related to drab2]

Drabble

(ˈdræbəl)
n
(Biography) Dame Margaret. born 1939, British novelist and editor. Her novels include The Needle's Eye (1972), The Radiant Way (1987), and The Seven Sisters (2002). She edited the 1985 edition of the Oxford Companion to Literature
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

drab•ble

(ˈdræb əl)

v.t., v.i. -bled, -bling.
to make or become wet and dirty; draggle.
[1350–1400; Middle English drabelen < Middle Low German drabbeln to wade in liquid mud, bespatter <drabbe liquid mud]

Drab•ble

(ˈdræb əl)
n.
Margaret, born 1939, English novelist (sister of A.S. Byatt).
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

drabble


Past participle: drabbled
Gerund: drabbling

Imperative
drabble
drabble
Present
I drabble
you drabble
he/she/it drabbles
we drabble
you drabble
they drabble
Preterite
I drabbled
you drabbled
he/she/it drabbled
we drabbled
you drabbled
they drabbled
Present Continuous
I am drabbling
you are drabbling
he/she/it is drabbling
we are drabbling
you are drabbling
they are drabbling
Present Perfect
I have drabbled
you have drabbled
he/she/it has drabbled
we have drabbled
you have drabbled
they have drabbled
Past Continuous
I was drabbling
you were drabbling
he/she/it was drabbling
we were drabbling
you were drabbling
they were drabbling
Past Perfect
I had drabbled
you had drabbled
he/she/it had drabbled
we had drabbled
you had drabbled
they had drabbled
Future
I will drabble
you will drabble
he/she/it will drabble
we will drabble
you will drabble
they will drabble
Future Perfect
I will have drabbled
you will have drabbled
he/she/it will have drabbled
we will have drabbled
you will have drabbled
they will have drabbled
Future Continuous
I will be drabbling
you will be drabbling
he/she/it will be drabbling
we will be drabbling
you will be drabbling
they will be drabbling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been drabbling
you have been drabbling
he/she/it has been drabbling
we have been drabbling
you have been drabbling
they have been drabbling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been drabbling
you will have been drabbling
he/she/it will have been drabbling
we will have been drabbling
you will have been drabbling
they will have been drabbling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been drabbling
you had been drabbling
he/she/it had been drabbling
we had been drabbling
you had been drabbling
they had been drabbling
Conditional
I would drabble
you would drabble
he/she/it would drabble
we would drabble
you would drabble
they would drabble
Past Conditional
I would have drabbled
you would have drabbled
he/she/it would have drabbled
we would have drabbled
you would have drabbled
they would have drabbled
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
References in periodicals archive ?
British writer Margaret Drabbles refined, shrewd voice has helped shape the literary world for over half a century.
Born in Sheffield, a working-class city in northern England, in 1939, Drabble attended a Quaker boarding school in York, where her mother taught.
Drabble's first three novels were largely semiautobiographical stories of young women navigating relationships and careers--precisely what she was doing as an admittedly content young single mother and author.
After these early works, Drabble broadened her scope to consider the state of the British nation and the individual's place in society.
Novelist Michael Cunningham asserts that "Drabble's novels are insightful, powerfully written, utterly unsentimental and driven by political convictions.
At the time Drabble was writing The Millstone, her third novel, she was a young mother expecting her third child.
As the title suggests, Rosamund's illegitimate child, Octavia, can sometimes feel like a burden, especially with her serious congenital heart defect (which one of Drabble's own children had).
"Drabble does not romanticize the reputed sexual liberation of women in the period.
The Drabbles say Stokesley is a brilliant place for first-time businesses to set up as it is so near the Teesside conurbation with good road links.
This is the firm view of Jim and Jacky Drabble, of Springfield Garden, who have been based in the area for the last 16 years.