drake


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drake 1

 (drāk)
n.
A male duck.

[Middle English.]

drake 2

 (drāk)
n.
A mayfly used as fishing bait. Also called drake fly.

[Middle English, dragon, from Old English draca, from West Germanic *drako, from Latin dracō; see dragon.]

drake

(dreɪk)
n
(Zoology) the male of any duck
[C13: perhaps from Low German; compare Middle Dutch andrake, Old High German antrahho]

drake

(dreɪk)
n
1. (Angling) angling an artificial fly resembling a mayfly
2. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) history a small cannon
3. an obsolete word for dragon
[Old English draca, ultimately from Latin dracō dragon]

Drake

(dreɪk)
n
(Biography) Sir Francis. ?1540–96, English navigator and buccaneer, the first Englishman to sail around the world (1577–80). He commanded a fleet against the Spanish Armada (1588) and contributed greatly to its defeat

drake

(dreɪk)

n.
a male duck. Compare duck 1 (def. 2).
[1250–1300]

Drake

(dreɪk)

n.
Sir Francis, c1540–96, English admiral and explorer.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.drake - English explorer and admiral who was the first Englishman to circumnavigate the globe and who helped to defeat the Spanish Armada (1540-1596)Drake - English explorer and admiral who was the first Englishman to circumnavigate the globe and who helped to defeat the Spanish Armada (1540-1596)
2.drake - adult male of a wild or domestic duck
duck - small wild or domesticated web-footed broad-billed swimming bird usually having a depressed body and short legs
Translations
ذَكَر البَط: عُلْجوم
kačer
andrik
patak
gácsér
andarsteggur
antinasgaigalas
pīļtēviņš
káčer
andrakedrake
erkek ördek

Drake

[dreɪk] NDraque

drake

[dreɪk] Npato m (macho)

drake

[ˈdreɪk] n (= male duck) → canard m (mâle)

drake

nErpel m, → Enterich m ? duck1

drake

[dreɪk] nmaschio dell'anatra

drake

(dreik) noun
a male duck.
References in classic literature ?
In the meantime, outside the palace walls, the poor White Duck swam up and down the pond; and near it laid three eggs, out of which there came one morning two little fluffy ducklings and a little ugly drake.
DRAKE -- I have received your letter from London, stating that you have found me a new parlor-maid at last, and that the girl is ready to return with you to St.
Drake was very complimentary; also Captain and Mrs.
Through them the symbols of the mandarin duck and drake, the one-winged birds, the tree whose boughs are interwoven, are revealed.
We'll have favourable winds, a quick passage, and not the least difficulty in finding the spot, and money to eat, to roll in, to play duck and drake with ever after.
According to him there had been captains among these coves and islets compared with whom Drake was practically a landsman.
You wave an airy adieu to the boys on shore, light your biggest pipe, and swagger about the deck as if you were Captain Cook, Sir Francis Drake, and Christopher Columbus all rolled into one.
while Philip searched for flat stones to play ducks and drakes.
A light cloud of smoke appeared beneath the sails, more blue than they, and spreading like a flower opening; then, at about a mile from the little canoe, they saw the ball take the crown off two or three waves, dig a white furrow in the sea, and disappear at the end of it, as inoffensive as the stone with which, in play, a boy makes ducks and drakes.
The flutter on the Tonopah Stock Exchange lasted just ten days, during which time his smashing, wild-bull game played ducks and drakes with the more stereotyped gamblers, and at the end of which time, having gambled Floridel into his fist, he let go for a net profit of half a million.
The drakes were handsome fellows, with pinkish grey bodies, their heads and necks covered with iridescent green feathers which grew close and full, changing to blue like a peacock's neck.
He soon made ducks and drakes of what I gave him, sank lower and lower, married another woman, I believe, became an adventurer, a gambler, and a cheat.