dramatic monologue


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Related to dramatic monologue: soliloquy

dramatic monologue

n.
A literary, usually verse composition in which a speaker reveals his or her character, often in relation to a critical situation or event, in a monologue addressed to the reader or to a presumed listener.

dramat′ic mon′ologue


n.
a literary form in which a character, addressing a silent auditor at a critical moment, reveals himself or herself and the dramatic situation.
[1930–35]
References in periodicals archive ?
It was his Sue's form, prostrate on the paving." (32) The scene of Sue's prostration under an over-sized cross is strikingly foreshadowed by Wilde's dramatic monologue. Compelled to discard his dandyish mask, he is eventually disgusted to find that under cover of night the veneers of civilization and classical culture have become transparent and have provided disconcerting insights into the darkest recesses of his mind:
The opera is essentially a dramatic monologue since we see only the woman and hear only her side of a 40-minute telephone conversation with her former lover.
Her poetic styles vary from haiku to streetwise dramatic monologue,
The main activity of the lesson involves students writing a dramatic monologue supposedly composed at some point by one of the characters in the Arthurian legend.
The dramatic monologue has brought attention to the stress on the persona, which embodies the conflict outside (with the external world) and inside (with its alter ego), as well as to the immediacy of the critical situation out of which the monologue issues.
Drama: TALKING HEADS 2: In the latest dramatic monologue, Julie Walters plays Marjory, who is dog tired of seeing her husband pay more attention to his canine friend Tina than he does to her.
A poem on Pilate's headquarters by the French baroque poet Jean de la Ceppede, a selection from contemporary Nicaraguan poet Ernesto Cardenal's "Cosmic Canticle," and a dramatic monologue in the voice of Pontius Pilate by American poet Vassar Miller round out the treatment of this episode.
Her dominant stance is the heroic within the populist: imagine, she constantly bids us, yourself in the place of people who live "like you do, a dozen slack rope-ends/ in each dream hand...." Her dominant form, which opens and closes Selected Poems, is the dramatic monologue. These reverberate with a babel of voices, giving Duffy's verse a feeling of density and population.
Ai succeeds in showing her readers that all "proclamation" is "performance." In addition, she's blurred the lines between audience and performer by her choice of subjects and use of the dramatic monologue. As readers, we inhabit her postmodern theatre, where voices speak from a field of rubble.
Even the most dramatic monologue of the evening ends on a quiescent tone.
However, theatrical writing led him in the direction of his most productive poetic form, the dramatic monologue. His volume Dramatic Lyrics (1842) broke new ground in the use of this form, and his Men and Women (1855) established him as the master of the dramatic monologue.
To the extent that the poet creates a somewhat separate personality for the speaker, the poem moves away from being a lyric and becomes more like a dramatic monologue.