dramatic monologue

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dramatic monologue

n.
A literary, usually verse composition in which a speaker reveals his or her character, often in relation to a critical situation or event, in a monologue addressed to the reader or to a presumed listener.

dramat′ic mon′ologue


n.
a literary form in which a character, addressing a silent auditor at a critical moment, reveals himself or herself and the dramatic situation.
[1930–35]
References in periodicals archive ?
In certain persona books, particular persona poems (where the character is not speaking or is not the central speaker) alternate with true dramatic monologues and with dialogues.
Focusing on the poetry of Augusta Webster, a poet distinguished in the nineteenth century for her dramatic monologues and in the twentieth for her unconventional auditors, this essay reopens the question of the auditor's function in the genre, but answers it by a different method.
Told through dramatic monologues to camera, and split screens, this is a unique take on the norm.
Told through dramatic monologues to camera, and split screens so we can watch the creepy action too, this is a unique take on the norm.
These poems include free verse and formal poems such as pantoums, epistolaries, dramatic monologues, a sestina, a catalog on sex cookies, and an ars poetica.
The book itself is structured as a collection of dramatic monologues spoken in the voices and dialects of various Viet Nam-era soldiers, from military policemen and bored company clerks to ambulance drivers and graves registration workers.
Like Robert Frost in his dramatic monologues and dialogues, David Landon's "Ash Wednesday: Coffee at Starbucks," shows how well a driving pentameter line can accommodate itself to narrative exposition.
The American poets, Robinson and Masters, use dramatic monologues to make us sympathize with misfits of the American scene, and Frost uses the form (often first-person narratives) to expose aberrations of mind and soul in New England.
The Cairo-based non-profit "BuSSy" raises awareness about the challenges Egyptian women face by transforming real-life experiences into dramatic monologues.
Actress Nina Millin delivers Beyonce lyrics as dramatic monologues on YouTube.
In place of the short comedic or dramatic monologues that they would usually be asked to prepare and perform for a Hollywood audition, Breitz asked each actor to learn and re-perform a series of quotations transcribed directly from online videos featuring local industry gurus offering professional advice to would-be child actors.