dramshop


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dramshop

(ˈdræmˌʃɒp)
n
US a bar or tavern where alcohol is sold in small units

dram•shop

(ˈdræmˌʃɒp)

n.
bar; barroom; saloon.
[1715–25]
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
From an unfinished house on the Varvarka, the ground floor of which was a dramshop, came drunken shouts and songs.
These men, who under the leadership of the tall lad were drinking in the dramshop that morning, had brought the publican some skins from the factory and for this had had drink served them.
When they paid him off he dodged the company gamblers and dramshops, and so they tried to kill him; but he escaped, and tramped it home, working at odd jobs, and sleeping always with one eye open.
Already confirmed to be attending are Dramshop and Berry Street favourite Chamber 36.
Dramshop case In addition to seeking damages from the puncher, Marko also represented the plaintiff in a case against McFaddens and the bar inside the BOB.
State, (74) the Supreme Court of Iowa sought to answer a relatively simple question: "Does Iowa's comparative fault act require joinder of all potential defendants in one action?" (75) After the car in which Selchert was riding went off the road and struck a pole, she sued the owner of the vehicle, the driver at the time of the accident, and an alleged dramshop. (76) Selchert secured a fault determination of 75 percent against the driver of the vehicle, while the other 25 percent was attributed to Selchert.
(106) The plaintiff urged the court to amend the common-law rule exempting social hosts from liability; the court, however, refused to do so, noting the legislature's adoption of the Dramshop Act.
On August 18, 2010, the Appellate Court of Illinois, First District, overturned a grant of summary judgment by the Circuit Court of Cook County, finding that the Dramshop Act does not preempt claims based on legal theories independent from the defendant's provision of alcohol.
* Doubles the amount of dramshop insurance coverage bars are required to carry to $1 million for single claimants and an aggregate of $2 million for incidents involving multiple parties.
Under dramshop acts, serving alcohol to a minor, or permitting a minor to consume alcohol on the premises, constitutes a misdemeanor.
In a dissent, Judge Richard Sanders said: "The majority goes where no court has gone before." He noted that Washington courts have required the "obviously drunk" standard before attaching liability since the repeal of the state's Dramshop Act in 1955.
This article is based on transcripts from cases brought under dramshop or civil damage acts, state legislation that formed an important part of the early onslaught against the saloon.