drank


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drank

 (drăngk)
v.
Past tense of drink.

drank

(dræŋk)
vb
the past tense of drink

drink

(drɪŋk)

v. drank, drunk, often, drank, drink•ing, v.i.
1. to take a liquid into the mouth and swallow it.
2. to imbibe alcoholic drinks, esp. habitually or excessively; tipple.
3. to show one's respect, affection, or good wishes for someone or something by a ceremonious swallow of wine or other drink (usu. fol. by to).
v.t.
4. to take (a liquid) into the mouth and swallow.
5. to take in (a liquid) in any manner; absorb.
6. to take in through the senses, esp. with eagerness and pleasure (often fol. by in).
7. to swallow the contents of (a cup, glass, etc.).
8. to propose or participate in a toast to (a person or thing); toast: to drink one's health.
9. drink up, to drink the whole or rest of (a beverage).
n.
10. any liquid that is swallowed to quench thirst, for nourishment, etc.; beverage.
11. liquor; alcohol.
12. excessive indulgence in alcohol: Drink was his downfall.
13. a swallow or draft of liquid: a drink of water.
14. the drink, a large body of water, as a lake or the ocean: Her teammates threw her in the drink.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English drincan; c. Old Saxon drinkan, Old High German trinchan, Old Norse drekka, Gothic drigkan]
syn: drink, imbibe, sip refer to taking liquids into the mouth. They are also used figuratively in the sense of taking in something through the mind or the senses. drink is the general word: to drink coffee; to drink in the music. imbibe is a more formal word, used most often in a figurative sense but also in reference to liquids, esp. alcohol: to imbibe culture; to imbibe with discretion. sip implies drinking little by little: to sip a soda; to sip the words of Shakespeare.
usage: Confusion tends to arise regarding the forms for the past tense and past participle of drink. The standard past tense is drank: We drank our coffee. The standard past participle is drunk: Who has drunk all the milk? Yet drank has a long and respectable history in English as a past participle: Who has drank all the milk? While this construction still occurs in the speech of some educated persons, it is largely rejected, esp. as a written form. drunk as the past tense (We drunk our coffee) was once a standard variant but is now considered nonstandard, although it sometimes occurs in speech. See also drunk.
Translations

drank

pret de drink
References in classic literature ?
"I did not lose the gold pieces, but I swallowed them when I drank the medicine."
After that, when I couldn't sneak out of it, I drank beer and wondered what men found in it that was so good.
But when the Mail took the streets of Birmingham, most young people we spoke to said they drank to socialise and not to get hammered, although they felt those in their late teens and early 20s were the worst binge drinkers.
And women who drank other soft drinks had no lower bone density.
Daily drinkers -- those who say they drank alcohol in the past 24 hours -- are more likely than those who drink less often to say they occasionally drink more than they should.
Twenty-two percent of the men and 10 percent of the women said they drank that much at least three times in the previous two weeks.
The animals drank as much as they wanted for 8 hours a day.
The newer study looked at the subjects' arterial stiffness and blood pressure during a fast, and then 30, 60, and 90 minutes after they drank 250 milliliters of red wine.
Men drank a mean of 73 days per year, while women drank 43.5 days per year.
(162) On occasion, women drank in taverns, much to the disgust of many of their fellow patrons.
And while more than half of the American teenagers who drank reported getting drunk, less than a fourth of young Southern European drinkers said they had been intoxicated.