drant

drant

(drɑːnt)
vb (intr)
to drone or drawl
n
a droning sound
References in periodicals archive ?
On the last page of the scrapbook is a photo of Deaconess Emma Britt Drant standing with a group of Chinese kids in front of True Sunshine Mission in Oakland.
In connection with the financing round, NEA general partner Ryan Drant and Justin Klein, a principal with NEA, will join CV Ingenuity's board of directors.
Thomas Drant preached before Elizabeth and her court in January of 1569 (old calendar), delivering a sermon that Peter McCullough describes as a "chastisement" of the queen (92).
In 1566, Thomas Drant's translation of Horace--one of the earliest modern English examples of satire--establishes the idea of satire as a caustic medicine (Paulson 148).
This is just one feature of the bespoke design which overall has also been specified to meet Nicol UK's precise operational requirements at its main facility, managing director, Cris Drant explains--"The unit is primarily associated with the cleaning of steel sections and pipe work," he says, "and comprises a number of key stages.
(9) Paul Slack, Poverty and Policy in Tudor and Stuart England (London, 1988), 19-21, 164, 167; Ian Archer, 'The Charity of Early Modern Londoners', Transactions of the Royal Historical Society 12 (2002), 226-7, citing works by Thomas Nashe and sermons by Lawrence Chadderton (1578), Nathaniel Shute (1626), Thomas Drant (1570), Henry Smith (1592), William Cupper (1592), Stephen Denison (1619), Andrew Willet (1603), Adam Hill (1595) and Daniel Price (1617).
[1] The first English translation of Horace's Satires was that of Thomas Drant, published in 1566, and there were several other versions published during the seventeenth century.
(13) While its direct influence might be questioned, the Anthology certainly was significant as an historic justification for writing religious epigrams, llaomas Drant's translation of Nazianzus in 1568, Epigrams and sentences spirituall in vers, provides some indication of the means by which this example became known: "Perusing (right honorable) some of the Germaine wryters, and delighting in their pretie & wittie verses, which to the texts and common places of holy scriptures they fitly have applied: I found no sayinges in them of a more quicke and godly sence, then those whiche they bringe oute of Gregorie Nazanzen, a Doctour of the Greeke churche very wel learned, and very eloquent" (sig.
A similar arrangement spelling Sara from her brother Grant was signed Drant, in reference to the way she pronounced his name.
1578 Drant (Webster) Years yead away and faces fair deflower.