drapetomania


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drapetomania

a mania for running away.
See also: Escape, Manias
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Drapetomania is a music album drawing upon acoustic, pop, and experimental stylings.
For instance, the absurd medical diagnoses of Drapetomania, "the disease causing negroes to run away," and Dysaesthesia Aethiopica, "a disease peculiar to negroes--called...
For example, he held that Black people suffer from the Negro disease known as drapetomania, which was a kind of mania for running away.
"Negro Disease" was referred to as drapetomania, a mental illness that showed "an irresistible propensity to run away." (14) The historical division of amaXhosa, surely even amaZulu, Batswana, Basotho and others, is not only a physical, territorial division that speaks to the antics of colonial "divide and rule," but also bodily and psychological divisions following Du Bois, and we could include Franz Fanon and Steve Biko.
Slaves who ran away from their masters, for instance, were diagnosed with drapetomania, a psychiatric disorder (Whitaker, 2002).
(13.) Drapetomania was a widely accepted category of mental illness that supposedly caused enslaved blacks to seek freedom.
As a result, two additional mental disorders were developed that were specific to African Americans (Jackson, 2002): drapetomania and rascality, scientifically labeled dysaethesia aethiopica.
Cartwright defined this so called mental illness as a medical condition which he called "drapetomania" or the disease causing Negroes to run away (Diseases and Pecularities of the Negro Race, 1851).4 Emmanuel Chukwudi Eze (1997), in his edited work called Race and the Enlightenment: A Reader, reminds us that great Western thinkers were not willing to imagine Black people as rational or reasonable beings and in fact used our Blackness as the grounds for labelling us as primitive.
Esch, the infamous nineteenth-century physician Samuel Cartwright promulgated such beliefs, diagnosing enslaved Africans with pseudoscientific ailments such as "drapetomania, or 'absconding from service' to seek freedom, and dysaesthesia Aethiopica, an illness whose 'diagnostic' was an inefficient, seemingly 'half-asleep' performance on the job and destruction of the master's property." Such diagnoses "pathologized resistance, transforming it into disease," ironically justifying strategies for race management that drove enslaved bodies to extremes (58, 59).
Cartwright described a condition that he called "drapetomania," a disease that made slaves try to flee captivity (Cartwright 1851).
* Labeling slaves' healthy desire to escape from their masters in the 19th century as an illness ("drapetomania")